Facebook Pixel

Anti-Aging Process Successful in Mice

Rate This

A research team at Harvard Medical School believes they have discovered the holy grail of anti-aging by successfully reversing the aging process in mice.

In our never-ending quest to fight the aging process, scientists at Harvard have reported a fascinating discovery in reversing this process in mice, which could eventually lead to discoveries in how to combat degeneration in humans.

Telomerase is an enzyme that creates the DNA repeat sequence on the end of chromosomes. Scientists have been aware for awhile about this enzyme but this is the first time there has been a successful experiment on a mammal.

As we age naturally, our levels of telomerase decrease. This is associated with tissue degeneration and a decline in brain function.

The Harvard scientists managed to genetically create mice with a controllable telomerane switch. This switch enabled the researchers to discover if they could turn on the telomerane switch in the mice and reverse the signs of degeneration.

In an amazing outcome it was discovered that they were able to reverse aging in the mice, including brain disease and infertility.

The mice experienced biological changes with new brain growth and testes, improved fertility and a return of lost cognitive function. The mice’s cells returned to a healthy state. Their dormant sperm cells returned, in turn producing larger litters.

The mice used in the experiment were sick but they were able to reverse their degeneration allowing the sick mice to live as long as the healthy mice used in the control.

Although this isn’t directly useful to humans, it could be a breakthrough to help combat degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. These findings could also help future treatments for rare genetic premature aging diseases.

“Whether this would impact on normal aging is a more difficult question,” said Ronald A DePinho, a Harvard Medical School professor of genetics, senior author of the research paper, which appeared in the online version of the journal Nature, and director of Dana-Farber’s Belfer Institute for Applied Cancer Science.

Add a Comment2 Comments

EmpowHER Guest

Have any of you tried DermCorrect?

December 6, 2010 - 10:57am
EmpowHER Guest

I am encouraged by the study of telomerase as it relates to aging. While the aging process is very complex problem to solve, it should be possible to achieve some degree of life extension for humans within the next few decades. My site: future-of-anti-aging.com strives to address the various breakthrough fields of technology that will radically improve our lives in the not too distant future. There are a number of great scientists working in the fields of biotechnology, nanotechnology, A.I., and robotics that will have a direct impact on how mankind deals with global issues as well as contributing to the health and longevity of the human race. The future could indeed be a fascinating one. I remain optimistic and hopeful.

December 5, 2010 - 3:41pm
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.


Get Email Updates

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!