Facebook Pixel

Treating Eczema Naturally

By Expert HERWriter
Rate This

Sometimes skin conditions can be caused or exacerbated by allergic reactions to certain foods. Eczema is the perfect example of a health condition which is affected by allergic reactions.

Eczema, also called atopic dermatitis, is first seen in infants or small children. It can affect any part of the body but generally appears on the arms, hands, feet, or behind the knees. In infants, small raised, itchy bumps can be found on the wrists, ankles face, neck, upper chest around the eyes or on the eyelids. If scratched these bumps can break, causing fluid to leak out and the bumps to crust over.

Sometimes, the bumps will be red to brownish-gray colored patches that come and go on the skin. The skin is very raw and may appear thicken or scaly. It is important to watch products and clothing that are placed on the skin to minimize any itching or discomfort. All cotton clothes, mild cleaning detergents and cleaning agents are key. Read clothing labels to avoid harsh chemicals and wools. Avoid hot water from baths or showers.

One of the most significant factors to help correct eczema is dietary factors. I have seen patients with eczema who improve their diet and see their skin clear and pain and itching alleviated.

There have been several studies that show correlations between food sensitivities or food allergies and eczema. The foods that cause the most trouble for people with this condition are dairy and wheat products. Dairy products include anything that comes from a cow: milks, cheeses, yogurts and food derived from dairy products can trigger an outbreak. Wheat products include breads, pastas, crackers, many cereals and most baked goods. If a patient has other food sensitivities or allergies those allergies must be addressed to address the skin problems. The digestive tract can usually become damaged from the allergies and sensitivities so I work with my patients to create a healthy whole food diet to help begin the repair process. I have them take probiotics to rebalance the gut flora or environment and support the repair process as well.

Add a Comment4 Comments

EmpowHER Guest

Yay!!! I am so so happy that you discussed probiotics and their benefit on Eczema! I am a firm believer in them and have been trying so hard to spread the word since our little boy was so dramatically helped when he began taking his Belly Boost (children's chewable probiotic). We could have never imagined that huge impact they would have on his Eczema and he not only began to clear right up but he could also eat so many more foods that we once thought he had an intolerance to. We still avoid his serious allergens but they have helped sooo much and I want to share our story to everyone who has this horrible skin condition.

March 27, 2010 - 6:37am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

This is awesome. I just sent probiotics to my daughter. She is teaching and one of her student teachers is suffering terribly from eczema on the elbows, knees and in hair line. I sent a product called Chrisal Allergy Free Probiotics. So far - so good. The product has cleared up the elbow and knee area. Her thick hair is making hair area more difficult to treat. But good news for sufferers.

April 6, 2010 - 3:29pm
EmpowHER Guest

Traditional Chinese Medicine is effective in treating these atopic conditions. I am a TCM doctor practising in Vancouver and am having great success treating eczema with herbal teas and topicals. You're right, it does all start with the digestion. Eczema is commonly a result of 'damp-heat' accumulation in the body, itself a result of a weak digestive system.

March 26, 2010 - 4:36pm
EmpowHER Guest

so sad i have eczema no fun at all

March 26, 2010 - 11:16am
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Atopic Dermatitis

Get Email Updates

Related Topics

Atopic Dermatitis Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.


Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!