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Black and Darker Hair Dyes May Be Linked With Cancers

By HERWriter
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For many women, using hair dye is just one of the many personal grooming practices they consider a necessary part of looking good. But Dr. Marianne Marchese is breaking the bad news. She states that there is a direct correlation between black hair dyes and other darker hair dyes and many cancers. This doesn't mean that hair dyes cause cancer. It does mean there is a link. Using darker hair dyes should be carefully reconsidered.

(Transcribed from video interview)

Dr. Marchese:

Yes, studies show that hair dyes, especially black hair dyes or the darker hair dyes, are directly correlated with bladder cancer, leukemia, brain cancer, and a slight risk with ovarian cancer.

About Dr. Marchese, N.D., LLC:
Dr. Marianne Marchese is a clinician, author, and educator. She graduated from Creighton University in 1990 with a B.S. in Occupational Therapy and specialized in neurological and orthopedic conditions while working at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Dr. Marchese received her Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from the National College of Naturopathic Medicine (NCNM) in Portland Oregon in 2002. She completed a two-year postgraduate residency in Integrative Medicine and Womens Health and completed a six-month post-graduate training in Environmental Medicine. Dr. Marchese has been an adjunct faculty member at a post-graduate college since 2003 teaching in the areas of women's health and environmental medicine. She first taught at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine and later at Life Chiropractic College. Currently, she is clinical supervisor at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine. Dr. Marchese offers full laboratory services for diagnosis of disease and utilizes the naturopathic treatment modalities of: nutrition, botanical medicine, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, chelation, cleansing, IV therapy, microcurrent, nutritional supplements, and natural bioidentical hormones. She utilizes an integrative model of health care and has a strong network of close relationships with practitioners of all disciplines.

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It's disturbing to read a blanket statement like this without any attribution or source provided.As a leukemia patient I find it personally disturbing to read a statement that hair color can cause leukemia.

According to Dr. Andrew Weil, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that working regularly with hair dyes in hair salons and barbershops probably increases the risk of cancer and that long term employment in these establishments is "probably carcinogenic to humans." However, the IARC, a World Health Organization panel, reported that there is not enough evidence to conclude that occasional personal use of hair coloring raises the risk of cancer.

Weil says the report, published in the April, 2008, issue of Lancet Oncology, is the first scientific word on the subject since 2005, when Spanish researchers reported that their review of 79 studies from 11 countries yielded no strong evidence of a link between hair dye and cancer risk. The only connection the Spanish team observed was the possibility of a slight increase in the risks of leukemia and multiple myeloma, but they concluded that the causal effect was too weak to be a major concern.

Earlier, researchers at Yale University found that long-term use of dark hair dye by women who began coloring their hair before 1980 may increase the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. No such risk was seen among women who began dyeing their hair after 1980. Here, the difference may be due to the elimination of coal-tar-derived ingredients used in the older products that are known carcinogens. The Yale study was published in the Jan. 15, 2004, issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

June 30, 2010 - 6:54pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.