Facebook Pixel

Did You Know About the Gynecologic Cancer Education Act?

Rate This

Most people are unaware of The Gynecologic Cancer Education and Awareness Act of 2005 (H.R. 1245-3) otherwise known as “Johanna’s Act”. Passed by both the House and the Senate of the US Congress, this act calls for development of a “national campaign to increase the awareness and knowledge of health care providers and women with respect to gynecologic cancers.” President George Bush signed this Act into law on January 12, 2007.

In addition to developing this “national campaign”, other requirements included developing and providing written informational documents to be distributed to the public upon request and the development of public service announcements or PSAs, informing the public that these materials were available. In addition, the PSAs were to encourage women to discuss gynecologic cancers with their physicians.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration were expected to contribute to these directives all of which the Secretary of the CDC was to have in place no later than March 1, 2008. For the period of fiscal years 2007 through 2009, Congress appropriated $16.5 million dollars.

The campaign eventually developed by the CDC was called Inside Knowledge. Considering the fact that not once did I ever see a television commercial, see a printed advertisement or see anything prominent on the Internet, I would say that the name was quite appropriate.

According to the website “Johanna’s Law”, Sharon Leigh, Founder/President of the Early Detection Cancer Corporation is very pleased that President Obama on December 23,2010 signed into action Johanna’s Law: The Gynecologic Education and Awareness Act. The 2010 version of Johanna’s Law will continue to allow the Center for disease Control and Prevention to educate women and medical professionals about the signs, symptoms and early detection of gynecologic cancers. The law will let the CDC work with national organizations encourage partnerships and avoid duplication of services and materials.”

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.