Facebook Pixel

Smoking Marijuana may Trigger Immune Suppression, Increase Cancer Risk

Rate This

Smoking marijuana can trigger the suppression of the body’s immune functions, revealing why users are more susceptible to certain cancers and infections, according to a new study by an international team of immunologists.

The team, led by Dr. Prakash Nagarkatti from the University of South Carolina, focused their research on cannabinoids, a group of compounds found inside the cannabis plant, including THC or delta-9 tetahydrocannabinol, which is already used legally in some places for medical purposes, such as pain relief.

Nagarkatti said the research is important because cannabis is one of the most widely used drugs worldwide. He believes cannabis triggers suppression of a unique type of immune cell, that has only recently been identified by immunologists, called myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSCs.)

In a healthy immune system, immune cells fight against infections and malignant cells to protect the host. MDSCs work in the opposite way to actively suppress the immune system. These cells are known to increase in cancer patients and the researchers believe they may even suppress the immune system to hinder cancer therapies as well as actually promote cancer growth.

While the research raises interesting questions about marijuana use increasing susceptibility to certain types of cancer or infections, the results could be beneficial to a large number of other clinical disorders where immune system suppression and cannabinoids' anti-inflammatory properties are desirable, such as arthritis, lupus, hepatitis, some allergies and multiple sclerosis, said Nagarkatti.

“In these, your immune system gets activated and starts destroying your own cells and tissues. You have to try to suppress your immune response,” he said. “In such instances, there is a need to develop drugs that can suppress the immune response.”

In a related study, Dr. Christian Vosshenrich from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, showed when cancer cells grow they produce a molecule called interleukin-1β, which also triggers MDSCs. This study identifies how MDSCs produced during cancer growth also weakens the ability of immune cells to kills cancer cells.

Add a Comment4 Comments

I wish police..really people above them since officers are just following orders...would stop wasting their time by closing down medical marijuana shops and instead go after crimes that actually hurt others..rape, robbery with weapons, etc.
Plus one thing they did not say is pot relaxes people with chronic diseases and many of us cannot have that one glass of wine because does not mix with our meds or just makes us sicker.

October 20, 2011 - 9:56am
EmpowHER Guest

Forget about all kind of lost and win stuff and just think for cannabis and marijuana highs and buy drugs for that from given below site name please go on legal-highs !!!!

October 8, 2011 - 3:32am
EmpowHER Guest

Notice how all these studies can only say "should", "could" and "may" but not a single study can show that cannabis "Does" cause cancer. To the contrary, many studies show that cannabis shrinks tumors. Tons of proof that prohibition of cannabis kills and destroys the lives of tens of thousands of people every year. The FDA, DEA, pharmaceutical companies, the prison industrial complex and politicians all profit from keeping you mis-informed about cannabis. Countless lives will continue to be ruined until we wake up and end prohibition.

January 10, 2011 - 9:59am
EmpowHER Guest

This 'research' is in direct contradiction to several studies that have indicated marijuana might have a protecting effect against certain cancers.

see: web md "Marijuana Unlikely to Cause Head, Neck, or Lung Cancer By Peggy Peck WebMD Health News"
at: http://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/news/20000508/marijuana-unlikely-to-cause-cancer

December 30, 2010 - 2:42pm
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.