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By September 5, 2013 - 5:59am
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Hi. I am a 33 year old woman who has had 2 live births. After the birth of my second child in 2009, I had a tubal ligation. I also started having incredibly irregular and heavy periods accompanied by extreme cramps, bloating, fatigue, constant pelvic aches that radiate down my legs, a feeling of pressure in my lower abdomen. At the time, I was put on birth control pills and told they would help regulate things and that it was probably just a hormone imbalance. My symptoms persisted on the pills, and I eventually moved and found a new doctor. (I should add that during this period I had a transvginal U/S that showed enlarged uterus and 3 ovarian cysts. They weren't concerned at this time, since I had had a child within the last year)

(2010)The second doctor also prescribed me birth control and put me on anxiety medication, stating that it was probably in my head. During this time I also started experiencing night sweats on occasion. She had a blood panel done, stating that I could be expieriencing early menopause symptoms. It came back negative. She sent me for no further testing.

(2013)My pain has worsened and become more persistent. Ibuprofen and a heating pad provide some relief, but not much. My periods are even heavier than they were before. At my husbands urging, I found a new dr. My new dr did a pelvic exam my first appointment and told me my uterus felt enlarged. I was then sent for an transvaginal ultrasound. (both the pelvic and the u/s were painful for me and left me in pain for days. After the U/S I experienced black, clumpy discharge. After a call to my Dr I was told this was probably 'old blood' being expelled by uterine cramping.) He found no fibroids, but there was a small hemorrhagic cyst on one of my ovaries. U/S also showed enlarged uterus and he said my lining appeared thicker than it should be. He believes from my symptoms and uterus, that I have adenomyosis. I was wondering if Adenomyosis is indeed a explanation for all of these recurring symptoms, and if hysterectomy is the best route, as that is what he's recommending. Since my last appointment I was in the ER for dizzy spells and a fainting episode following a period even heavier than mine normally are.

*Reposting this as it was accidently deleted. I also added a few more details I left out in the original post.

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Thanks Susan. My doctor feels confident I'll be able to keep both my parties, he does want to take a look at the one that seems prone to mid-large cysts, but he says he wouldn't remove it unless absolutely neccesary. I've been doing a lot of research, and I'm feeling a lot better about the prospect. Surgery is scarey for any reason. It appears the medical field has come a long way since my aunts hysterectomy 20 plus years ago. She still tells horror storiea about it, lol. I go In Monday for more information, and possibly some blood tests.

September 7, 2013 - 3:14pm
HERWriter Guide

Hi tnt07

Thanks for your post and I am sorry you in so much pain and distress with this.

Adenomyosis is a condition where the tissue that normally grows inside the uterus, grows into the muscular walls of the uterus. It occurs after you’ve had children and can be very painful indeed.But adenomyosis is often the final diagnosis, after a lot of other things (growths, cancers, endometriosis) .

Your symptoms are indeed linked to adenomyosis, like:

Heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding
• Severe cramping or sharp, knife-like pelvic pain during menstruation (dysmenorrhea)
• Menstrual cramps that last throughout your period and worsen as you get older
• Pain during intercourse
• Bleeding between periods
• Passing blood clots during your period.

Adenomyosis typically goes away after menopause. So the treatment a woman chooses usually depends on how close she is to this period of her life.

You are very young so you may not want to wait for menopause - the average start age is 52, nearly 20 years away for you. But a hysterectomy will put you straight into menopause if it's a full hysterectomy. If you can keep your ovaries, then it may be something to consider.It's a big surgery so make sure you weigh all your options and make sure to ask your doctor if a partial hysterectomy is what will work.

I hope this has helped!


September 5, 2013 - 11:26am
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