Facebook Pixel
EmpowHER Guest

Period every 2 weeks

By Anonymous May 31, 2015 - 2:06pm
Rate This

I had my implant out for 2 years, the doctor said my period would go back to normal but it never did I still get periods every 2 weeks, I ask the doctors but they say its natural but I thought 2 years would be far to long and everything should be back to normal by now, right? I know for sure I'm not ovulating what should I do ? As the doctors are no help. Thank you

Add a Comment1 Comments

HERWriter Guide

Hi Anon

Thanks for your post! 

You're right, it doesn't take two years to get back to normal after birth control removal. Some of the reasons I talk about below may pertain to you. 

The menstrual cycle occurs in all females from the onset to puberty (average age 11 or 12 years) to the menopause in middle age (average age between 45-55). The lining of the uterus is shed via vaginal bleeding when a girl or woman has not conceived a pregnancy. 

The menstrual period lasts between two days and seven days, usually occurring once every 28 days, although anything from once every 24 days to once every 35 days is considered normal.

If you are having a period more than once every 24 days, it is considered an irregular cycle.

Having a period once every two weeks, or twice a month is abnormal and you should see your doctor because you may become anemic if you are having very frequent periods. They are sometimes a sign of infection or other medical problem that would need treatment.

Reasons for a period every two weeks could be:

• Dramatic weight loss or gain -- This changes the hormones in the body and these are responsible for directing when the period will start.

• Excessive exercise -- This too disrupts hormones.

• Stress -- Exams, family argument, financial worries, divorce, even a holiday can cause a temporary change in your menstrual cycle.

• Illness and/or medications -- Some medications can affect your cycle. Talk to your doctor about altering or stopping your medication if you think this is happening.

• Uterine problems such as polyps, cysts, fibroids or tumors (either benign or cancerous).

• Sexually transmitted infections -- These can cause bleeding in between periods which can be mistaken for a period.

• Thyroid problems -- Thyroid disease could cause a thickening of the uterine lining, resulting in more bleeding than normal.

• Reactions to contraceptive methods -- Sometimes the pill, depo provera injections or the copper-only IUD can result in a change in your cycle.

~ Sometimes changing or stopping your method of contraception can cause a sudden drop in hormones and this can result in a change to your cycle.

• Onset of menopause -- In women aged 45 and over, having periods every two weeks can be a sign that you are about to go through menopause. It can be a sign of ovulation beginning to shut down. If you are under 45, having irregular periods in addition to other symptoms commonly associated with menopause, may signal premature ovarian failure.

However, to rule out other possibilities your doctor should perform a pelvic examination. Your doctor should also take a sample of the uterine lining as well as doing an ultrasound scan to see if there are any obstructions in the uterus, such as fibroids.

If any obstructions are found, you can be referred for surgery to have them removed. If any cancer is found, you will be referred to an oncologist who will plan your care with you.

Sexually transmitted infections can be treated with antibiotics (and the use of condoms to prevent further infections). Your partner may have to be treated as well.

If the problem is caused by a contraceptive device or medication, this can usually be changed to stop the problem.

Heavy and/or frequent periods can sometimes be controlled by certain brands of the pill. If you find they are really disrupting your life, for instance, you are bleeding through your clothes, have to miss work days and can’t plan your holidays, this may be an option depending on your medical history.

Hormone treatment could also be given in this scenario, if you have thyroid disease or if you are starting menopause.

Anon, I suggest you ask your doctor for some of these tests. 
June 1, 2015 - 4:53am
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

All user-generated information on this site is the opinion of its author only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical conditions. Members and guests are responsible for their own posts and the potential consequences of those posts detailed in our Terms of Service.

Menstrual Cycle

Get Email Updates

Related Checklists

Menstrual Cycle Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.


Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!