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Hemophilia Symptoms & Diagnosis

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Hemophilia Guide

Christine Jeffries

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Symptoms

The severity of symptoms can vary. Severe forms become apparent early on. Bleeding is the main symptom. It may be noticed if an infant is circumcised. Additional bleeding problems appear when the infant becomes mobile.

Bleeding can be caused by an injury. It can produce excessive bruising after a minor trauma or cut. It can also cause bleeding after extraction of teeth. Bleeding into joints is a common sign. This is called hemarthrosis. Intestinal bleeding may produce bloody stools. If it occurs in the small intestine it will cause black, tarry stools.

Mild cases may go unnoticed until later in life. Then they occur in response to surgery or trauma.

Symptoms for Hemophilia A and B may include:

  • Hot, swollen, sore, stiff, and/or deformed joints
  • Bleeding into muscles
  • Bleeding into the intestinal tract
  • Bloody stools
  • Bloody urine
  • Difficulty stopping bleeding after minor cuts or bumps
  • Heavy bleeding even after simple surgical or dental procedures

Symptoms for Hemophilia B may include:

Diagnosis

Coagulation studies look at the ability of the blood to clot. These studies involve many tests. They are done if the person tested is the first one in the family with the disorder. Once identified, other family members will need less testing for a diagnosis.

The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.

Tests may include:

  • Tests of bleeding time
  • Blood tests to measure the amounts of clotting factors present

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright © 2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved.

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