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Plantar Fasciitis Treatments

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Plantar Fasciitis Guide

Maryann Gromisch RN Guide

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Treatment

Treatments include:

Rehabilitation Measures to Reduce Plantar Fascia Irritation

  • Avoid running and other activities that may worsen pain.
  • Apply ice or a cold pack to the heel and arch for 15 to 20 minutes, 4 times a day to relieve pain. Wrap the ice or cold pack in a towel. Do not apply the ice directly to your skin.
  • Night splint—A special splint that will hold your foot in a neutral position while sleeping.
  • Orthotics—Special shoe inserts provide support for the mid-arch region of your foot.
  • Begin stretching exercises to lengthen the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia as recommended by a health care professional. This is usually done when the acute pain has resolved or improved.

Medication

The following medications can relieve pain and inflammation:

  • Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil)
  • Naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn)
  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  • Aspirin

Procedures

Corticosteroid injections are controversial, but may be an option in some cases (may be given by a doctor). In certain cases, a new special type of sound wave called, extracorporeal shock wave, may be appropriate (also under the care of your doctor). At this time, this is generally a treatment for chronic, refractory cases.

Surgery

In a few cases, basic treatments don't help, and surgery is performed to cut the tight, swollen fascia. Heel spurs have not been proven to cause plantar fasciitis, and they do not need to be routinely surgically removed.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright © 2014 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved.

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