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GINKGO EVALUATION OF MEMORY (GEM) STUDY FAILS TO SHOW BENEFIT IN PREVENTING DEMENTIA IN THE ELDERLY

 
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The dietary supplement Ginkgo biloba was found to be ineffective in reducing the development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older people, according to a study published in the "Journal of the American Medical Association"[1]. Researchers led by Stephen T. DeKosky, M.D., formerly of the University of Pittsburgh, vice president and dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, conducted the trial known as the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEM) study at four clinical sites over the course of 8 years. GEM is the largest clinical trial ever to evaluate ginkgo's effect on the occurrence of dementia.

This research was co-funded by five components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH): National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM); National Institute on Aging (NIA); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Office of Dietary Supplements.

"We have made enormous progress in understanding the basic mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease, and we continue to pursue a vigorous program to translate what we know into the development and testing of new potential therapies for this devastating disease," said Richard Hodes, M.D., director of the NIA. "However, it is disappointing that the dietary supplement tested in this study had no effect in preventing Alzheimer's disease."

GEM enrolled 3,069 participants age 75 or older with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment. Those with dementia were excluded from participation. After extensive medical and neuropsychological screening, participants were randomly assigned to receive twice-daily doses of either 120 milligrams of ginkgo extract or an identical-appearing placebo. The 240 milligrams daily dose of ginkgo was selected based on current dosage recommendations and prior clinical studies indicating possible effectiveness at this dose. The products used in the study were supplied by Schwabe Pharmaceuticals, a German company.

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