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Control Pre-Diabetes to Lower Your Risk

By HERWriter
 
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lower your risk for diabetes by controlling pre-diabetes Piotr Marcinski/PhotoSpin

If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes it’s important to know what you can do to reduce your risks. Pre-diabetes is a condition that results when your body is not able to regulate your blood sugar or blood glucose level the way it should.

With pre-diabetes, your sugar levels are higher than they should be, but not high enough to be called full diabetes.

When you eat, your body converts food like carbohydrates into sugar or glucose which is carried through the bloodstream to all the cells in your body. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key to unlock the cells so they can take in sugar from your blood.

Without insulin, the sugar remains in the bloodstream and your glucose levels become too high while your cells starve because they cannot access the sugar they need for energy.

Pre-diabetes can occur when your body is not able to produce enough insulin, or when your cells become resistant to insulin so that it cannot work effectively.

Most people with pre-diabetes don’t have any symptoms. If your doctor suspects you are at risk for diabetes, he or she may order a blood test to check your sugar levels.

Anyone can develop diabetes, but there are some factors that can increase your risk of the disease:

• Being over age 40 and overweight

• Having high blood pressure

• Having high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol

• Having a close family member who has diabetes

• Having gestational diabetes while pregnant

If you are concerned about your risk for diabetes, the American Diabetes Association has a simple test you can take online.

Most people with pre-diabetes don’t have any symptoms. If your doctor suspects you are at risk for diabetes, he or she may order a blood test to check your sugar levels.

Having pre-diabetes puts you at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This type often occurs when your cells become resistant to the insulin your body produces.

Being overweight is a significant risk factor in developing type 2 diabetes.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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