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Emotionally Coping with Diabetes

By Marianne Tetlow
 
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woman with diabetes must cope emotionally
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Are you coping well as a woman living with diabetes? Have you stopped long enough to consider not only how your blood glucose levels compare, but also whether you are keeping up emotionally with your life and health?

Are you so busy working, parenting or trying to manage it all, that you have forgotten about yourself?

Diabetes is tough. There is no doubt about it. It is also something that you are told that you can handle.

Is it annoying at times? Yes.

Can you handle that? Usually yes.

It is frustrating, painful, scary, and at times, empowering. It is a balancing act that never stops. Usually you get to a place that you think, “Yes, it is hard, but I know the rules and I can manage”.

I have been through all of these emotions and then some. I’m sure you have too. I also realize that it is imperative that I keep up my emotional stability about my life with diabetes on a regular basis.

I can be a great wife, mother and career woman for only so long until things start to get sideways, unless I am balancing my emotional state and my diabetes.

I forget to share my feelings and frustrations about it. I forget to discuss things with others who sometimes have great insight or helpful tips that I had not thought of.

These seem simple, but are so very important to my ability to handle it all!

Connecting with other diabetics, a therapist, a certified diabetes educator or a diabetes coach can help you gain a fresh perspective on the same old routine that all people with diabetes follow.

Realizing that you are not alone is power. It is reassuring and supportive.

Sometimes you need a good talking to. Other times you need a compassionate shoulder to cry on. The best approach, in my opinion, is to talk with another person with diabetes. You can share and have a good laugh.

I try to approach my life with moderation. This is a crucial step for me. I do not need to discuss it every day. I simply need to remind myself to do it regularly.

I should try to put it on the calendar, like exercise, therapy, meditation and exercise. I’ll try to remember to do that.

By Marianne Tetlow “The Diabetes Coach”

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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