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Endometriosis Guide

Alison Beaver

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Endometriosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By Dr. Carrie Jones Expert HERWriter
 
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Endometriosis is a painful condition where tissue from inside the uterus grows in other places, such as the abdominal cavity, over the ovaries, on the intestines, in the vagina or the cervix. Rarely does the tissue travel to further sites such as the lungs or brain, however it can occur.

When the tissue implants, it often causes all sorts of problems such as pelvic and abdominal pain, pain with intercourse, pain with bowel movements or urination, fertility problems, menstrual problems, and more. Symptoms are usually worse near or during the menstrual cycle but can be a problem all cycle long.

Many with endometriosis have gastrointestinal problems because of the implants adhering to the intestinal or colon walls, creating a lot of pain, diarrhea, constipation or overall irritable bowel symptoms (IBS). Now, researchers in Denmark have studied almost 38,000 women with endometriosis and found a direct link between it and the development of inflammatory bowel disease (different from IBS) such as ulcerative colitis and crohn’s disease.

The researchers aren’t entirely sure why this link exists. However they have surmised that it is due to the shared immune system issues that cause the development of both inflammatory conditions, and/or the use of oral contraceptives to help endometriosis symptoms increases the risk of IBD.

Those with endometriosis are typically diagnosed based on symptoms and/or surgical evaluation. Endometriosis does not usually show up on an ultrasound, therefore if your pelvic ultrasound is normal it does not mean you are free and clear. It must be pretty severe to show up on MRI.

Surgery is typically done through tiny incisions in the abdomen where your doctor can use a camera to see the implants and then remove them if necessary. They may still grow back however.

Mainstream treatment for endometriosis involves trials with pain medications, oral contraceptives to control hormones, the IUD with a progestin in it known as the Mirena, surgery, and other stronger hormone-type medications.

Add a Comment4 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Denmark have studied almost 38,000 women with endometriosis and found a direct link between it and the development of inflammatory bowel disease (different from IBS) such as ulcerative colitis and crohn’s disease.

August 7, 2013 - 12:10am
endocarol

Endometriosis is a hormonal and immune-system disease. Lesions or scar tissue can implant on the bowel (as well as on other organs in the pelvic region), interfering with normal bowel function and causing pain. Intestinal or "gut" health is extremely important for women with endo (and anyone with immune system issues). Taking a good quality probiotic is essential. For more information see the books available at www.EndometriosisAssn.org

February 8, 2012 - 10:28am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

If endometriosis is somehow linked to bowel disease, I would be curious to know if the collagen in the intestine with Collagenous Colitis, is in fact, endometriosis. Isn't endometriosis a type of elasticity type tissue?

January 22, 2012 - 7:30pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

I wondered the same thing. I was diagnosed with endometriosis when I was 17 and then with Collagenous Colitis when I was 37.

August 15, 2013 - 6:41pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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