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Food People Mistake As Healthy, But Are Not

By Expert HERWriter
 
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Several weeks ago I was asked to create a list of food that people commonly mistake for being a health food, but really they are not. It was an interesting question, so I started polling my patients, friends, and other doctors to see what was on their lists as well.

I have decided to share items on the list for the next several weeks so you can see how we are marketed to about what is healthy when it really may not be.

Juice Drinks and sports drinks may not be a healthy alternative to soda. You must read the label. If it is not 100% juice then you should not be drinking it at all. Many fruit drinks or fruit beverages are not 100% juice. Many juice drinks that are not 100% juice contain high fructose corn syrup, synthetic flavors, colors additives and preservatives.

There are many problems associated with high fructose corn syrup because it does not get processed through our normal glucose pathway. Instead it gets converted into fat and increases triglycerides in the body and blood. High fructose corn syrup adversely impacts our ability to process normal sugar, or glucose, and over time this causes fatty deposits in the liver, which adversely affects live function. It also depletes the body of the nutrients iron, magnesium, calcium, and zinc.

Finally, it causes insulin resistance and leptin resistance increasing fat storage over time. Synthetic flavors, colors, additives and preservatives create a toxic burden to the liver and it’s processing.

100% juice is much better because it contains phytonutrients and trace mineral depending on the product. Juice, because it doesn’t have any fiber, is still high in sugar and can affect blood sugar levels. For this reason, I only recommend 4 oz of juice at one time. No more than 2 servings per day. Also, because there is no fiber, I do not consider juice to be a serving size of fruits or vegetables like I have seen mentioned on commercials.

Live Vibrantly,

Dr. Dae

Dr. Dae's website: www.healthydaes.org
Dr. Dae's book: Daelicious! Recipes for Vibrant Living can be purchased @ www.amazon.com or www.healthydaes.org

Dr. Dae's Bio:

Add a Comment3 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I work as a registered dietitian in a k-8 school district and the issue of food choices comes up quite often in nutrition education classes. We share with our students that high fructose corn syrup is a sweetener just like table sugar or honey and is metabolized in the body in a similar fashion. Stating that "There are many problems associated with high fructose corn syrup because it does not get processed through our normal glucose pathway. Instead it gets converted into fat and increases triglycerides in the body and blood. High fructose corn syrup adversely impacts our ability to process normal sugar, or glucose, and over time this causes fatty deposits in the liver, which adversely affects live function. It also depletes the body of the nutrients iron, magnesium, calcium, and zinc." is incorrect. All caloric sweeteners trigger an insulin response in the body. In fact, table sugar, honey and high fructose corn syrup trigger about the same insulin release, because they contain nearly equal amounts of fructose and glucose.
While I appreciate the fact that Dr. Dae wants to offer a list of healthy foods to her readers, she should offer information that is based on sound evidence based science so consumers can make informed choices.
Carol Sloan RD

June 26, 2009 - 9:58pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

DON’T CONFUSE PURE FRUCTOSE WITH SUGAR OR HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP.

The posting from Dr. Daemon Jones makes a common, but unfortunate, mistake by treating High Fructose Corn Syrup and fructose as though they are identical….they are not.

Fructose is, as the name implies, 100% fructose. High Fructose Corn Syrup is essentially half fructose and half glucose just like sugar. A better comparison for HFCS would be with table sugar (sucrose) which is what it is designed to replace in the human diet. Studies in my research laboratory and others have shown that by every parameter yet measured in human beings including insulin, leptin, ghrelin, blood sugar, uric acid, triglycerides, appetite and calories consumed at a subsequent meal High Fructose Corn Syrup and table sugar (sucrose) are identical.

There is no evidence whatsoever that High Fructose Corn Syrup creates any unique metabolic abnormalities, despite the assertions that Dr. Jones makes. In fact, there is overwhelming scientific agreement to the contrary, namely that High Fructose Corn Syrup and sucrose are metabolized the same, have the same sweetness, have the same calories per gram and may be consumed in moderation without causing metabolic abnormalities. The American Medical Association studied HFCS for a year and found that there was no unique relationship to High Fructose Corn Syrup and obesity. Research in my laboratory has also shown that High Fructose Corn Syrup does not cause either insulin resistance or excessive fat storage.

It is time for those of us in the scientific community to stop confusing the public by mischaracterizing High Fructose Corn Syrup as though it is the same as pure fructose. The comparison of HFCS and sucrose (table sugar) is the correct comparison and in this real world setting there are no metabolic abnormalities based on moderate consumption of either.

James M. Rippe, M.D.

June 25, 2009 - 11:39am

I am looking forward to reading more of your articles on this. Food manufacturers can be very clever at promoting a product as 'health and good for you' when they are not. I often find the words "All Natural" do not necessarily mean it doesn't have artificial colours, flavours and preservatives.

Lots of drinks are, for example orange, because of colours and food dies like 102, that make them orange. I have a great Breville juicer and make my own juices with fruits and vegeatables. Then I know exactly what is in it! :)

I am glad you are posting on this topic and are exposing what is really in some foods.

June 19, 2009 - 6:38pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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