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Get Your Man To The Doctor: 3 Health Concerns Can Be Caught Early

By HERWriter Blogger
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Get Your Man To The Doctor: Catch 3 Health Concerns Early MonkeyBusiness Images/PhotoSpin

The stereotype that men don't go to the doctor is a stereotype for a reason. Any woman who has tried to cajole, encourage, or strongly suggest that her dad, husband, son, brother, or another man in her life, go to the doctor has most likely felt the pushback.

A survey, conducted by The American Academy of Family Physicians and quoted by Men's Health Magazine, found that over half (55 percent) of all men in the United States have not seen their doctor in the past 12 months.

A 2001 study from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as quoted on WebMD.com, found that men are 33 percent less likely to visit their doctor than women are.

The fact that men don't want to go to the doctor should not stop women from encouraging them to go.

It is imperative that everyone see their doctor for an annual visit to maintain their health and catch any issues early enough to be corrected.

If high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar, and other health issues are not detected in an early stage, they can develop into deadly conditions. There is a reason men die at a younger age than women, and that reason could be because they didn’t seek preventative care.

There are many reasons you should encourage the men in your life to get a physical exam, but the biggest reason is to catch issues early.

Here are three major health concerns that are preventable if caught early enough:

1) Heart Disease

According to the CDC, one in every four men have heart disease. It is the leading killer for both men and women, but almost twice as many men die of cardiovascular conditions than women.

Getting yearly checkups of blood pressure, cholesterol and weight can help doctors know if a man’s risk of heart attack, or another major problem, is increasing.

2) Suicide

Men are four times more likely to commit suicide than women, according to WebMD. This may be due to the cultural norm of men being less emotive and not expressing their feelings.

A yearly checkup by a medical professional may detect depression and suggest ways to treat it.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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