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Voice Disorders

By HERWriter
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If you’ve ever cheered a team to victory or had a cold, you’ve probably had experience with vocal changes, hoarseness, or even laryngitis. A temporary change in voice is normal in these instances. But if you ever have a change in voice that lasts for more than two weeks, it’s time for a trip to the doctor.

The Anatomy of Talking
When we speak, air passes through the larynx, or voice box in our throat. Inside the larynx there are two vocal cords or folds which are bands of smooth muscle that lie opposite each other. When we breathe, these vocal folds open to allow air to pass through. When we vocalize, the folds come together and vibrate when air passes between them. The sound from this vibration travels through the throat, nose, and mouth to produce speech or singing.

Disorders of the Voice
Voice disorders occur when something goes wrong with the vocal folds. This could be laryngitis or hoarseness caused by a viral or bacterial infection – conditions that will typically clear up within two weeks. People who use their voices excessively, such as singers, cheerleaders, teachers, and lawyers, may also suffer from long term hoarseness as a result of vocal abuse or misuse.

The National Institute of Health lists these as the most common disorders resulting from vocal abuse:

Laryngitis – inflammation or swelling of the vocal folds. The voice of someone with laryngitis will often sound raspy, breathy, and hoarse.

Vocal nodules – small, non-cancerous growths on the vocal cords. Nodules typically form in pairs at the point where the vocal cords come together, much like a callous forms on the feet where there is pressure from shoes. Vocal nodules are the most common voice disorder directly related to vocal abuse. The voice of a person with nodules usually sounds hoarse, low-pitched, and slightly breathy.

Vocal polyps – non-cancerous growths that are softer than vocal nodules, more like a blister than a callous.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.



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