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It Is All in Your Back: Briefly Exploring Spinal Stenosis

 
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The human spine is constantly put to work each day. It is expected to hold us up and maintain our stature. Nonetheless, there are certain conditions that affect our spine that do not allow for it to do its job effectively and on task. Included in the list of back ailments that can affect people, spinal stenosis is chief among them.

The human spine is constantly put to work each day. It is expected to hold us up and maintain our stature. Nonetheless, there are certain conditions that affect our spine that do not allow for it to do its job effectively and on task. Included in the list of back ailments that can affect people, spinal stenosis is chief among them.

Spinal stenosis happens when one or more areas in the spine are narrowed. Typically called “lumbar spinal stenosis,” nerves become pinched due to the narrowing of the spinal cord, resulting in persistent pain in the buttocks, lack of feeling in the lower extremities, limping, and decreased physical activity.

According to www.spinalstenosis.org, the most common type of this condition is degenerative stenosis. This affects practically the entire adult population due to the natural process of aging. Over time, the spinal canal tends to narrow. This narrowing causes a compression of spinal nerves and nerve roots, causing a host of symptoms, from lower back pain to lower extremity pain. This condition usually develops in people well into their 60s or older. Conversely, congenital lumbar stenosis is quite rare. This condition becomes evident much earlier on, usually between the ages of 30 and 40.

Interestingly enough, spinal stenosis is an enigma, as it can neither be predicted nor prevented. It can affect one regardless of sex, race, or ethnicity. There is no evidence, either, to suggest it is associated with a certain occupation or a particular body type.

When diagnosing a patient for spinal stenosis, the physician will most likely examine the extent of the patient’s limited movement, according to the spinal stenosis Web site. The doctor will further assess the amount of pain afflicting the patient when bending back wards. Finally, the loss of extremity reflexes will be examined.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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