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Birth Control Pills, Like Batteries, Become The Latest Focus of Environmental Concerns

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Columbia News Service

Some experts are blaming birth control pills for contaminated water.

Wherever possible, Tina Casale switches to compact fluorescent lightbulbs. She also recycles daily, rides in carpools or walks when she can, and, as a third-grade teacher, has made it a priority to ensure that global warming is a frequent topic in her science discussions.

But in the eyes of some activists, Casale could be doing more to save the environment: Namely, tossing out her birth control pills.

Birth control pills, like batteries and baby bottles, have become the latest item in American homes to become a focus of environmental and health concerns. As scientists debate the effects of synthetic hormones that are flushed into waterways, the potential threat has sparked a clash between advocates and critics of the pill.


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