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High Dose Aspirin Shot to Relieve Migraines

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It was over 150 years ago that French chemist Charles Frederic Gerhardt first prepared aceylsalicylic acid, which was to eventually become the staple of medicine cabinets everywhere and more commonly known as aspirin.

For those people who suffer from the chronic and debilitating symptoms of a migraine it will come as a beacon of hope that something as simple as aspirin may help.

Researchers at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Headache Center believe that not only can a high dose of injected liquid aspirin help the pain of migraines, but eventually those suffering from severe headaches too. Their findings were recently published in the journal Neurology.

Symptoms of severe migraines include a thumping headache, impaired vision, nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite.

Injecting liquid aspirin is intended for those that suffer migraines so severe that they are hospitalized. One gram of liquid aspirin is injected directly into a patient's bloodstream. The dose is 10 times the amount you would normally take.

It is important that the aspirin be injected rather than swallowed to prevent the stomach from bleeding.

Aspirin works by blocking the production of enzymes called cyclooxygenase, which are important for the release of prostaglandins, the hormone that sends pain signals to the brain.

The conventional method of treating chronic migraines is by giving patients triptans, most commonly used to restore the chemical balance in the brain. Triptans are not always successful for migraine sufferers.

Aspirin is a lot less expensive than triptans and have proved in studies to be just as, if not more, effective. A single dose of triptans costs $22, as opposed to a single shot of aspirin which costs just $7.

Another benefit of using aspirin is it is non-toxic, non-addictive and non-sedating, making safe to take over a prolonged period.

Chronic migraine sufferers often build up a resistance to their pain medication and have to have their dose increased. When their dose is eventually lowered they can experience withdrawal symptoms.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.



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