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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and the Psychiatrist

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The counselor I saw about my hypochondria and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), scheduled an appointment for me with a psychiatrist who specializes in the disorder(s). After waiting for a very long time, I finally had the appointment!

I had decided that I wanted my shrink to be a woman, because I would feel more comfortable with her and sure enough, in January, I finally met my psychiatrist face to face. She was young, (I am middle aged), and from a spanish speaking country in South America. I found her to be rather strict the first time we met.

Before I go into details, I want to describe the two times that I took Zoloft, which had been prescribed by my primary care doctor in October. I only took one dosage in December and another one in January. Both times the effects were terrible and I felt groggy, sleepy, headachy. My judgment was impaired and each time the effects lasted about a day and a half.

On the flip side, the pills blocked out any obsessive thoughts, but I decided not to take them again. I spoke to my primary care doctor and she advised me to cut a pill in half and then take it. I never followed her advice. The side effects that I had felt frightened me.

Getting back to the first visit with my shrink, whom I shall call Dr. Romero, and that of course is not her real name. She was the opposite of the counselor, who was a woman who wore a look of sympathy on her face, and showed so much understanding.

Dr. Romero is a third year resident. She asked a million routine questions on that first visit and then did a little concentration test, which I passed. I became emotional on that visit which she took in stride, and handled calmly. She told me that she would be using cognitive behavior therapy, and I was very pleased because she did not mention the use of any drugs.

The first visit left me a little confused and puzzled because I felt that my shrink was going to be a force to be dealt with. I worried that perhaps what I really needed was someone like the counselor who was terribly empathetic.

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HERWriter Guide

Hi Ladies

Talking to a psychiatrist or psychologist the first few sessions is difficult. Like any relationship, a level of comfort doesn't happen overnight. It takes some time to build trust with someone, including (and sometimes especially!) when that person is in the medical field.

As patients, we are not in the control seat and are naturally defensive. One wrong word or look from a doctor and we feel uncomfortable and maybe a little judged.

But all relationships need a level of chemistry. If you find, after a few sessions, that you have no chemistry at all, you may want to choose another doctor. But give yourselves (and your therapist) a chance for at least a few sessions and then reevaluate.

I wish you both the very best!


March 17, 2010 - 11:23am

i was thinking about the same thing. i also, myself hate going to people that i don't know about my problems.. i have someone that i can relate to and she was going to become a psychologist. i usually talk to her about my problems that i have been having

March 17, 2010 - 9:27am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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