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Home Remedies for Roseola

By HERWriter
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Roseola (also known as sixth disease, exanthem subitum and roseola infantum) is a viral illness in young children. Most commonly affecting are those between 6 months and 3 years old. It is usually marked by several days of high fever followed by a distinctive rash just as the fever breaks.

The high fever often ends abruptly and at about the same time a pinkish-red flat or raised rash appears on the trunk and spreads over the body. The rash's spots blanch (turn white) when you touch them and individual spots may have a lighter halo around them. The rash usually spreads to the neck, face, arms, and legs. The fever of roseola lasts from 3 to 7 days followed by a rash lasting from hours to a few days.

Roseola is contagious and spreads through tiny drops of fluid from the nose and throat of infected people. These drops are expelled when an infected person talks, laughs, sneezes, or coughs. Other people who breathe the drops in or touch them and then touch their own noses or mouths can then also become infected.

There is no known way to prevent the spread of roseola. Since the infection usually affects young kids (rarely adults), it is thought that a bout of roseola in childhood may provide some lasting immunity to the illness. Repeat cases of roseola may occur but they are not common.

Roseola usually does not require professional treatment. Most treatment is aimed at reducing the high fever. Antibiotics cannot treat roseola because a virus (not a bacterium) causes it.

Like most viruses, roseola just needs to run its course. Once the fever subsides, your child should feel better soon. However, a fever can make your child uncomfortable. To treat your child's fever at home, your doctor may recommend:

Plenty of rest. Let your child rest in bed until the fever disappears.

Plenty of fluids. Encourage your child to drink clear fluids, such as water, ginger ale, lemon-lime soda, clear broth or an electrolyte solution (such as Pedialyte) or sports drinks (such as Gatorade and Powerade) to prevent dehydration. Remove the gas bubbles from carbonated fluids.

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EmpowHER Guest

Taking in plenty of water or fluids is one of the most effective natural remedy for such illness. Thanks for sharing the facts.

April 13, 2010 - 8:42pm
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.



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