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Are you Sexually Fulfilled in Your Relationship? Take the Sexual Satisfaction Quiz

 
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Current sex research shows that there are strong positive associations between sexual satisfaction and overall relationship satisfaction. In fact, when couples are feeling sexually dissatisfied in their relationships, “marital-therapy that focuses on nonsexual relationship issues results in significant increases in sexual satisfaction.” (Source below). This can be generalized to include non-married couples as well.

Communication is definitely the key to long-term happiness, and it continues to be the link between both relationship satisfaction and sexual satisfaction. In a recent survey of adults over 45 years of age, “roughly two-thirds report they discuss sexual satisfaction with their partner, but only about half say they are satisfied with their sex life.”

What would help increase satisfaction with sex?

Regardless of age, those with a regular sex partner are more satisfied with their sex life than those who do not have a regular sex partner, according to the research. (Source below). Other factors include: “better health for themselves or their partner, less stress, and more initiative from their partner when it comes to having sex”. Fortunately, only 4 percent of men and women surveyed stated the reason for their sexual dissatisfaction was “wanting a different partner”, and only 2 percent wanted “more partners”.

When women are concerned about the “lack of sexual satisfaction” in their relationship, what are they really worried about?

Many women and men are concerned about their overall sex life once the frequency declines. Prior to this occurring, satisfaction may be declining, but it is difficult to pinpoint exactly what is wrong; it is difficult to explain to our partner what it is that we need. We tell our partners that we are “not satisfied” in global, all-or-nothing phrases, but it is much easier to try to improve smaller aspects of a relationship when you are not feeling like “everything” is wrong. There are many types of sexual satisfaction, and by identifying your needs, it may be easier to talk with your partner.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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