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About Post Rape Stress Disorder

 
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, also known as PTSD, can occur after any traumatic situation. Many tend to associate the post traumatic syndrome with somebody who has been in a war, and this misconception undermines other forms of trauma. Somebody who has been in a car accident, for example, may also struggle with the symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder

It is important not to judge “which situation is worse” because PTSD will stem from the personal experience and the level of stress involved. This article discusses a very particular type of trauma and the varying levels of PTSD that may occur as a result.

What is Post Rape Syndrome?

Post rape syndrome is a very normal, and very human, reaction to an extreme or abnormal situation. Our bodies are capable of handling normal amounts of stress, and some things just do not fall under the category of a normal amount of stress. Post Rape Stress Disorder is the post traumatic stress syndrome that a rape victim will develop.

There is limited information available about post rape stress disorder, because this psychological disorder is generally classifies as a post traumatic stress syndrome. The symptoms are very similar, but there should be more awareness of the specific symptoms that are unique to post rape syndrome.

The Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

The symptoms of PTSD vary from one individual to the next, as does the severity of the disruption in one’s ability to live a normal life. However, one does not need to experience each of the PTSD symptoms. If you think you might be suffering PTSD, please speak to your doctor for a more specific and accurate assessment.

* Frequently having upsetting thoughts or memories of the experience.
* Recurring nightmares
* “Flashbacks” (acting, or feeling, as though the experience is happening again.)
* Very strong feelings of distress when reminded of the event
* Strong physical responses when reminded of the event (increased heart rate or sweating, for example.)

Add a Comment4 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

happene to me about he do Rape to on my Bed to and he name is Brian

January 17, 2011 - 4:31pm

I was raped years ago, but recently attacked at work by a male patient. The attack was not sexual, just physical. I started having recurrent dreams of the rape. I can.t sleep. I wake up profusely sweating and shaking. I am unable to have sex with my partner, I have such anxiety just thinking of it. Any comments that would help me will be appreciated. To Make matters worse, my twin sister died in March, and I am sinking so deep into depression. Because of my job, and questions on renewal of lic. I am fearful of seeking treatment. When you are investigated for jobs now, it might show up that I was treated for a mental disorder.

July 16, 2009 - 2:34pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Thank you for your comment! I would like everybody who reads this article to know that I am currently in the process of an entire series on the topic of post rape syndrome. There is a shortage of information available for women struggling with this disorder, completely unaware of the damages it causes (or how to take control back) and I intend to change that!

The next few articles focus on rebuilding intimacy with a partner when you are suffering post rape syndrome. I recognize that post rapy syndrome is its own form of sexual disorder, and would like to help those who want to rebuild healthy relationships without leaving their own comfort zones.

A quick tip, for those considering therapy when you are not ready to willingly discuss it: there is no rush to talk about those things. However, you should begin counseling as soon as possible. You can talk about anything you want to talk about, to get comfortable with your counselor. If you are not comfortable with your counselor, you can find another one. It is easier to speak to a counselor about those things, when you are ready, than it is to speak to a friend. However, you will be more comfortable speaking to a counselor who you already feel comfortable with.

April 12, 2009 - 6:34am

AnneOminous,

Thank you so much for writing such a clear, informative post about post-rape syndrome. I see that already, it has 228 reads -- that tells me that the topic resonates with a lot of women. Clearly there's a need for this information.

I wonder if you might write about therapy for those with post-rape traumatic stress? Specifically, how does a woman who has been raped -- and can barely think about it, much less talk about it -- go about getting help for something that has affected her this deeply and profoundly?

April 12, 2009 - 6:02am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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