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Sex Advice for Victims of Post Rape Syndrome

 
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There are two elements to post rape syndrome that should be treated individually, as well as together. This article focuses on the sexual disorder that comes when you are traumatized by the very idea of having sex, even with somebody you love and trust.

A Quick Foreword…

When you have been sexually abused, you suffer in more ways than the average mind can comprehend. You do not have to suffer in silence, and if you are in a relationship you should not try to suffer in silence. Talking to your partner can be the most difficult thing imaginable, but withdrawing from a partner is what all too often leads to failed relationships.

These exercises are provided as a tried and tested effective plan for those who suffer post rape syndrome, who are ready to rebuild a sexual connection with a partner. All of these tips should only be followed while you are actively participating in a counseling program.

Every person is different. Some choose to stick to abstinence for the rest of their lives, as a result of the discomfort that sex can cause when you suffer post rape syndrome. Sexual abuse can take something very special and enjoyable and quickly turn it into a nightmare… and it is not as easy to flip the switch back.

If you decide that you would like to rebuild a healthy sexual life with a partner, it’s important this decision be based on your own desires (not your partners’) and, while everyone is different and there is no cookie cutter approach, there are some guidelines that should be followed.

If You Feel Uncomfortable… STOP!

Post rape syndrome is a form of post traumatic stress disorder. When you suffer post rape syndrome, the physical act of sex can be very painful- physically, mentally, and emotionally- and it’s important to stop the moment you feel uncomfortable. Many women have a difficult time with this because it can be hard to tell a partner to stop right in the middle.

Have open discussions with your partner about your feelings towards sex, and if you both agree that trying unsuccessfully is better than not trying at all… establish different ways to communicate a negative response.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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