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Are You Experiencing Bleeding After Sex? When to See a Doctor

By HERWriter
 
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Have You Had Bleeding After Sex? When to See a Doctor Piotr Marcinski/Fotolia

Bleeding after sex is not uncommon. Nearly 10 percent of women report that they’ve experienced it at some point, according to CNN.com.

Women bleed after sex for many reasons. The vagina may be the source of the blood. For women of all ages, small vaginal tears from intercourse can happen and cause bleeding.

However, it’s more common after menopause, due to vaginal dryness. The vagina has lost much of its elasticity by then. Other vaginal tears may come from childbirth or from friction during sex.

Other possible causes could be cervical or uterine polyps, which are growths on the cervix, or inside the uterus. These cells are very sensitive to the touch, and may bleed.

Or cervical ectropion may be to blame for bleeding after sex. This is when an area on the surface of the cervix is inflamed.

It could also be due to pelvic inflammatory disease, or a sexual transmitted disease such as chlamydia or gonorrhea.

Bleeding after sex could signal cervical or vaginal cancer. Fortunately, the risk of cancer associated with bleeding after sex is rare.

Seeing unexpected blood can prompt anyone to think they need medical attention. When should you see a doctor if you experience bleeding after sex?

Premenopausal women who have sporadic bleeding after sex, and have normal Pap tests and sexually transmitted infection screenings, most likely do not need to see a doctor, said Mayo Clinic.

However, if this type of bleeding concerns you, go ahead and see your doctor. If you are at risk for, or may have been exposed to, an STD, definitely see your doctor. You'll want to have any vaginal discharge examined, since STDs such as chlamydia can cause bleeding if they affect the cervix.

For postmenopausal women, any type of vaginal bleeding should be discussed with a doctor. Make an appointment to ensure the bleeding isn't something serious, Mayo Clinic urges. If it is serious, finding out early can help with future treatment.

When it comes to bleeding after sex, MyHealth.Alberta recommends that you seek immediate medical attention if:

-The vaginal bleeding is so severe that maxi pads are soaked every one or two hours.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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