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Boost Your Sex Life with DHEA

 
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For many women, sex is not pleasurable. This problem is even more significant after menopause. There are countless remedies being sold in retail and health food stores to help women restore their sexual appetite. Unfortunately the majority of these products are bogus and cost a fortune.

Now there is a study from Italy which claims that the dietary supplement, dehydroepiandrosterone, (DHEA) may help increase sexual activity in post-menopausal females.

In this small study conducted by Dr Genezzani from the University of Pisa women took 10 mg day of DHEA. The other women took 1 mg day of estradiol and 5 mg/day of dihydrogesterone or daily oral tibolone (2.5 mg) for 12 months.

At the end of the study, women who took DHEA noticed a marked improvement in their sex life. (1)

DHEA is a well-known low potency sex steroid. It is naturally secreted in very low amounts by the body and is a precursor for both the male and female sex hormones. Over the years, the product has been sold in health food stores for the treatment of many medical disorders but there is insufficient evidence to support its use for most disorders.

In the past, studies to assess effective of DHEA as a sex stimulant have been confusing and not easy to interpret. While some studies claim that it enhances libido, there are others which claim just the opposite. How DHEA can boost the desire for sex in women is also not known, but may be related to its hormone-replacing ability.

Though this study appears promising, additional research is needed to make a strong recommendation for its use as a sex aid.

DHEA is available as tablets, capsules and injections. The recommended doses range from 25-200 milligrams daily. There is also a 5-10 percent cream containing DHEA that can be used up to 4 weeks.

For the consumer, it is important to know that there are no long-term studies on the safety of DHEA. DHEA is known to cause higher than normal levels of estrogens and androgens in the body. Experts indicate that these high hormone levels could potentially increase the risk of breast, prostate, ovarian, and uterine cancers.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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