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Discussing Sex With Your Doctor

By Expert HERWriter
 
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woman-and-doctor-talk-about-sex Keith Brofsky/Photodisc/Thinkstock

The last time you saw your health care providerd did they ask you about sex? Did you bring it up?

As it turns out, there are a number of women turning to the internet (like our own EmpowHER website), magazines, and their girlfriends, in order to find answers to some sexual questions that may be best addressed by their providers in certain situations.

While websites and girlfriends can provide some pretty sound advice, you may need more help beyond a chat board.

Are you experiencing a declining sex drive? There are a number of possible reasons for this, however it may have to do with your hormones -- and by hormones I mean all of them.

Your thyroid, adrenal and female hormones all interact to help with your energy, focus, sleep patterns, sense of well being, stress management and of course, your sex drive. Ask about hormone testing and see how in or out of balance your body has become through the years.

Keep in mind, a declining sex drive can happen in a woman’s 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s and beyond. It is not just a byproduct of menopause. Plenty of women are "too tired" in their younger years.

Is it painful?
Painful sex may be the result of a chronic infection or declining estrogen levels in the vaginal area. It may also be due to musculature or anatomical changes that need addressing with pelvic floor physical therapy.

Before you start laughing, keep in mind the pelvic bowl is an area made up of incredibly strong muscles and they may also need physical therapy just as if you strained your back or pulled a hamstring.

Talk with your health care provider about a good referral and get tested for infections and estrogen levels.

Are you on medications?
Certain medications such as antidepressants, birth control pills, diabetes medications and some blood pressure medications have libido-crushing side effects for women.

Sometimes, stopping these medications (talk with your health care provider first!) does not immediately alleviate the problem. It may take many months to return to "normal".

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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