Hide This

FREEHER HealthToolkit

HER Health Toolkit

Sign up for EmpowHER updates and you'll receive our
FREE HER Health Toolkit

Sexual Health

Get Email Updates

Related Checklists

Sexual Health Guide

Rosa Cabrera RN

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!

IUD Increasing in Popularity

By Nina Jacinto
 
Rate This

Did you know that IUDs are becoming more popular as a method of contraception? According to a recent Newsweek report, that IUDs are becoming more popular as a form of contraceptive. As a result of changed laws in 2005 that allowed all women to use IUDs (instead of just women who had gone through childbirth), the use of the contraceptive has increased by 161 percent, and continues to grow.

It seems the stigma of the IUD is fading, after it was recalled in the 1970s, many women felt resistant about using it as a method of birth control, even though it is reported to be 99 percent effective when used correctly.

Recent data and studies suggest that the links between infertility and IUDs are not valid and the IUDs don't increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease or infertility among women who contract sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs).

Now, more people consider it a viable and safe alternative to many other methods, such as the condom (which can be inconvenient to use and relies on many partners to take initiative in protecting your own health) and the birth control pill (which needs to be taken everyday).

The IUD can be expensive initially, - between $175 and $650 - and needs to be inserted by a medical professional. But it lasts for up to 12 years - furthermore, there are hormone-less versions of the IUD. Given the recent research that there may be a link to female sexual dysfunction and the use of hormone birth control methods, this can be a benefit for many. Some even suggest that using an IUD can protect against pathogens that lead to STDs.

Furthermore, they're over 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy! Considering the monthly cost and daily commitment of the birth control pill, the IUD seems more convenient to use.

Still, the cost of the IUD makes it very inaccessible to many low-income women who are looking to adopt a safe method of birth control.

Add a Comment1 Comments

EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

I used an IUD from 1998 to 2008. That one was good for 8 years so the time was up plus it had migrated north and embedded there in the wall of my uterus so it had to be surgically removed. Not a big deal though. We used condoms for almost 2 years but the husband didn't really enjoy that and I guess neither did I so we opted for the Mirena this time. Very painful going in because my cervix likes to hide from the ob/gyn doc and well, they are kind of painful anyway when they go through your cervix. Take some anti inflammatory medicine before you go!

May 14, 2010 - 2:40pm
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Improved

1706 Health

Changed

642 Lives

Saved

497 Lives
4 lives impacted in the last 24 hrs Learn More

Take Our Featured Health Poll

Do you think sex gets better as you age? :
View Results