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Sex Therapists: What Do They Do?

By HERWriter
 
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Fans of the movie, “Meet the Fockers,” remember Barbra Streisand as Roz Focker, a sex therapist for senior citizens. She repeatedly embarrassed her son by going on about her knowledge of sex.

In real life, a sex therapist is a very real and serious profession. A sex therapist is a psychologist, health care professional or a licensed counselor with special training in issues related to sex and relationships.

Concerns about sex and intimacy are common. At some point, nearly a third of all men and a half of all women have significant concerns related to sexual function, sexual feelings or intimacy. Sex therapy can help. Sex therapists have heard of every type of problem before, so they don't judge.

Sex therapists treat sexual dysfunction, such as trouble reaching orgasm, premature ejaculation or erectile dysfunction, low libido, unwanted sexual fetishes, sexual addiction, painful intercourse, or a lack of sexual confidence and other problems caused by stress, tiredness and other environmental and relationship factors. They also assist people recovering from sexual assault,.

Talking about sex and intimacy can be awkward. But sex therapists are trained to make people feel comfortable. It can also be tough to communicate with your partner about sex. A sex therapist can help you learn to express yourself clearly and better understand your partner's needs

Sex therapists discuss ways to resolve concerns and help patients learn skills and techniques to improve communication and intimacy. Typically a sex therapist will have you and your partner do a series of homework exercises. These may include reading about sexual techniques, slowing down and focusing on what you're sensing during sexual encounters and changing the way you interact with your partner during sex.

For the majority of sex therapists, there is no sexual contact between the patient and the therapist. Certified sex therapists sign a code of ethics that prohibits sexual contact of any sort. For a certified sex therapist, to do so is considered unethical, and in some states it's against the law.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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