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Sexually Transmitted Diseases Guide

Rosa Cabrera RN

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Golden Showers from a Health Perspective

By Shaina Gaul
 
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Golden showers, also known as urine play or watersports, involve the use of urine in sexual encounters. In a typical scenario, one person generally urinates on their partner’s body, genitals, or face, and the partner may either touch or ingest the urine. This is most commonly used in a dominant/submissive roleplay. While golden showers are subjective in terms of their value as a sexual tool, their safety in is a truly objective matter that every couple needs to be aware of.

Urine is only sterile when a person is of good health. This means that fungal, bacterial, and viral infections can all be transmitted through urine. The primary method of transmission is through an open wound, such as a burn or scrape, which means infection will occur more easily on the body than in the mouth.

The biggest health concern related to golden showers is hepatitis. Those suffering from hepatitis B can transmit the disease through their urine even if they aren’t showing any symptoms. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is another common virus that can be easily transmitted through urine, resulting in flu-like symptoms.

You also need to be careful when it comes to genital herpes, because an infected individual does not have to show any symptoms or open sores for transmission to occur. In fact, broken skin on the back, arms, or any place on the body may start to develop cold sores if infected.

The two most common STDs, chlamydia and gonorrhea, may be transmitted to the throat if ingestion occurs. Although transmission of HIV is theoretically possible, the chance of it occurring is very small. There are no known cases of HIV transmission through urine, but those who are already infected with HIV should definitely avoid watersports. Risk of a life-threatening infection is too high, especially when it comes to fungal infections like histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidiomycosis (valley fever).

One thing to keep in mind (apart from disease) is that certain recreational drugs and medications are usually present in urine in varying amounts. So if you have a drug test coming up at work, avoid engaging in watersports with those who partake in illegal substances.

Add a Comment2 Comments

Alison Beaver

Please know that this article contains misinformation.

"Golden showers" are not considered a low risk sexual behavior, and are not part of a "safer sex" option for many couples.

A sexual activity is considered "high risk" if it is likely to transmit STDs or STIs to another person, and this can occur with any bodily fluid (semen, vaginal secretions, urine, blood) that comes into contact with any mucus membrane (vagina, urethra, mouth, anus, etc.) or open sore.

When considering what is determined as a "high risk" or "low risk" sexual activity, it is important to know what the "risk" is, whether the couple is trying to prevent pregnancy and/or to prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Many couples can choose to play with "golden showers" in their sexual play, but it is important to know that this is NOT a safer sex option in regards to protection against STDs and STIs.

It is absolutely false to quote the author, "In conclusion, from a health perspective, golden showers are not necessarily more risky than any other sexual activity." There are many sexual activities that are low risk and do not increase the chance of transmitting STDs or STIs.

It is important to talk with your partner and openly communicate, as is suggested above, and this is a separate issue from knowing what is a high risk sexual behavior in the medical, health and wellness communities.

May 18, 2010 - 2:19pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

what the f***

[comment edited by Moderator]

May 18, 2010 - 11:30am
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