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Straighten Your Hair by Taking a Pill?

By HERWriter
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It seems no matter what¬--we want the opposite of what we have. Short people want to be taller, brunettes want to be blonds and those with curly hair wish it was straight. Current research has brought us one step closer for those with Shirley Temple hair to have Cleopatra’s. A recent study has discovered that a single gene is responsible for influencing whether hair will be straight or curly. With that discovery, a pill could be developed to change the texture of our hair. Would you take it?

Researchers from Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR) in Australia analyzed data from 5,000 twins over a period of 30 years. They found that variations in the Trichohyalin (TCHH) gene, which is involved in the development of hair follicles, determines the growth of curly or straight hair.

A few years ago, it was discovered by scientists at L’Oreal that curly hair grows from follicles that are hook shaped and straight hair from follicles that are round, but it was not known what mechanism determined the shape of the follicles. This new research implies that the TCHH gene is that missing key in determining the texture of our hair.

Are there benefits to testing for hair genes?

1. You could find out whether an unborn baby will have curly or straight hair: Of the various characteristics one wants to learn about an unborn child, hair curliness probably wouldn’t be high on anyone’s list. Genetic testing should be reserved for determining genetic issues that are life threatening.

2. A pill can be developed to straighten hair: Apparently in 2005, L’Oreal announced that they were working on such a pill. According to Bionews, Professor Nick Martin, the lead researcher of the Australian study discussed above, has plans to talk with a “Paris” cosmetics company, which many think is L’Oreal, regarding how this new discovery could help develop a pill that could make hair straight or curly.

Forum postings appear to be mostly against developing a pill expressing that people should just accept their curly or straight hair.

Add a Comment23 Comments

EmpowHER Guest

Unfortunately ladies, most of you will be deceased before this pill hits the market. Researches are VERY VERY FAR OFF from even beginning clinical trials on non human subjects.
So for all those anxiously asking "WHEN WILL THIS BE RELEASED?!"
and so on, I can inform you with almost 100% certainty, Not in your lifetime, if ever.
we are stuck with the pile of garbage sat upon our heads. Hair is human waste after all lest we forget .
so cool yur' heels and buy a better flat iron!

March 27, 2015 - 6:01pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

Unfortunately, you can't read. you have comprehensive issues but what baffles me is you are quick to run your mouth. You claimed it takes 12 years for a drug to be approved and sent on the market. That is false. Here is a quote of the actual law that you misread:Manufacturers of original biologic drugs will have at least 12 years before others will be able to use their data to produce and sell similar versions of the drugs, according to a provision in the new health reform law

This doesn't mean it takes 12 years for the drug to go on the market, all it means is other companies can't use the data used to come out with a simular law because the government protects the manufacturer. It takes 12 years for ANOTHER drug with the same concept to come out whcih is basically a generic drug. The original manufacturers will be able to sell this drug after testing and approval.

February 19, 2016 - 2:33am
EmpowHER Guest

It takes twelve years to make a drug. Also if that drug fails, than you will have to wait another 12 years.

February 20, 2015 - 10:21pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

Why are you spreading lies? It doesn't take 12 years for a drug to be on the market, it takes 12 years for ANOTHER company to make that same drug which is called generic drugs.

February 19, 2016 - 2:37am
EmpowHER Guest

Oh wow, this would be great!! When I was young I used to have a beautiful slightly curled hair but since I got hit with puberty my hair became so frizzy I'm only comfortable keeping it really short (BTW I'm a guy). I hope it won't take long for it to be available, 7 years is a long time but each second is worth the waiting if they deliver.

July 17, 2012 - 4:49pm
EmpowHER Guest

I just found this article. I'm EXTREMELY interested in this. Is Loreal continuing to do research? Or anyone else for that matter?

May 30, 2012 - 3:19pm
HERWriter Guide (reply to Anonymous)

Hi Anon

You may need to contact L'Oreal directly to see, but it looks like this pill will be a long time in the making.



May 31, 2012 - 9:04am

I did a quick search and found this quote from another person's article written in Aug 2010.
"So, where is the straight hair pill today? I got in touch with Professor Martin to see if they had made any headway. Unfortunately, no such luck. “The idea is that knowing the gene responsible for straight/curly hair, one might be able to design a drug that could alter it. But this is years away I am afraid,” he said via email."

from http://truthinaging.com/hair/the-straight-hair-pill-still-a-pipedream

So I would imagine they are working on it because it would be such a popular product but there is no way to know when it will be released.

May 1, 2011 - 7:24am
EmpowHER Guest

When are they going to release it??? My goodness!!! They have been researching it since 2005, right? We don't even have their address or where to address to make a kind of pressure. Please, let us know at least a date. Thanks!!!

April 30, 2011 - 9:41pm
EmpowHER Guest

I would try this for sure...I would love to wake up without the lion mane and having to put so much effort into straightening my hair along with the damage I put into it.

Keep us posted.

April 2, 2011 - 9:06am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.