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Being Human First

By Dr. David Katz Expert HERWriter
 
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being human must come first
Jaimie Duplass/PhotoSpin

An earlier version of this column first appeared on the Huffington Post.

In medicine, we pledge: primum non nocere. First, do no harm. But before we can do no harm as doctors, we need to be doctors. And before we can be doctors, we need to be human beings. Being a doctor is a great privilege, but it is a subordinate privilege. Being human comes first.

I distinctly recall the time in my medical education when I realized I was becoming more medical and less human. The process of learning how to conduct a complete history and physical had so taken over my brain that I could no longer remember how to have a conversation with a patient. The structured interview offered benefits, of course, but the loss of spontaneous human interaction seemed a high price to pay.

Fortunately, this proved to be a symptom of immaturity, professional if not personal -- and perhaps a bit of both. When I eventually knew the steps of the history and physical well enough to stop fixating on them, the human elements of interaction were once again accessible. I am pleased to say I have talked -- really talked, and even listened! -- to my patients ever since.

I spent many years involved in medical education, so I know I'm not alone. I have seen many good young people subordinate their good youthful and perfectly human capacity to communicate to the tyranny of the structured interview. Many can be taught to get past this. I'm not sure all can, however.

I think that education in the subtleties of human interaction, and communication in all its nuances, must start much earlier than medical school or residency training. I think we should be raised on it. Much of this is the work of family, but not all -- for the human family is much larger, and more diverse.

It is in this context that a general decline in instruction in the humanities recently noted in the New York Times worries me, for such courses in the fundamentals of who we are reverberate with relevance to the course of human events.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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