Facebook Pixel

What Causes Addiction?

By HERWriter
 
Rate This
What Causes Addictions? Photographee.eu/Fotolia

The pleasure from addictive substances and behaviors flood the brain with dopamine and other neurotransmitters. The overstimulation produces euphoric effects in response to the substances or behaviors. This then can form a pattern that encourages people to repeat using that substance or continuing that behavior.

Continual exposure to these addictive substances or behaviors cause nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex to expect those dopamine overloads. People then become addicted to the substance or behavior.

Furthermore, substance or behavioral addiction is directly linked to the speed in which dopamine is released, the intensity of that release, and the reliability of that release, wrote HelpGuide.org.

Put all of that together, then add in biology and environmental factors, and you have the causes of addiction.

Reviewed April 28, 2016
by Michele Blacksberg RN
Edited Jody Smith

"Understanding Addiction.": How Addiction Hijacks the Brain. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/how-addiction-hijacks-the-brain.htm

"Addiction: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments." Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/addiction

"Drug Abuse and Addiction Causes, Symptoms, and Prevention Facts." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/drug-abuse-addiction

Weiss, Rob. "This Is What ACTUALLY Causes Addiction." Mindbodygreen. N.p., 2016. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-23892/this-is-what-actually-causes-addiction.html

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Addictions

Get Email Updates

Addictions Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!