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3 Difficult Questions Family Must Decide for Alzheimer's Patients

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3 Difficult Decisions Family Must Make for Alzheimer's Patients De Visu/fotolia

They may have adult day care programs or respite programs so that even if you do keep your loved one at home, you may be able to have them step in and help from time to time.

3) Visiting if the person no longer recognizes you

The decision to still visit someone who no longer seems to recognize you is a hard one. Deciding whether to visit first depends on whether you emotionally and psychologically feel OK about seeing the person even though he or she no longer knows your name or remembers who you are.

If you find it too difficult or painful to see your loved one who no longer knows you, try not to feel too guilty about not going. It just adds to your stress.

If you feel that you are still able to visit the person, or if visiting helps you feel closer to the person, then by all means visit.

Deep down, we have no way of knowing whether somewhere inside, the Alzheimer's patient recognizes that you are someone familiar to them even if they no longer can say your name. They may still recognize you on some level.

There is no right or wrong decision. There is only the best decision you can make at the time.

Michele is an R.N. freelance writer with a special interest in women’s health care and quality of care issues.

Edited by Jody Smith

THE BLOG: 3 Controversial Decisions Alzheimer’s Caregivers Must Face. Huffington Post.com. Retrieved Nov. 20, 2016.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marie-marley/alzheimers-caregivers_b_12726366.html

Respite Care. Finding and Choosing Respite Services. Help.org. Retrieved Nov. 20, 2016.
http://www.helpguide.org/articles/caregiving/respite-care.htm

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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