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Gum Disease Treatments

Treatment

Gingivitis therapy aims to remove the irritating plaque and prevent its return.

Treatment includes:

  • Regular dental check ups and good oral hygiene
  • Careful and frequent brushing and flossing
  • A healthful diet that is low in saturated fat and rich in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables

Self-care

Brushing

Thoroughly brush and floss your teeth. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush held at a 45° angle to the line where your teeth and gums meet. An electronic toothbrush may make brushing easier for patients with physical limitations. Replace the brush when the bristles become bent or frayed or every 3-4 months. Move the brush in small circular movements along the gumline and chewing surfaces of your teeth.

Flossing

Brushing removes bacteria from the teeth, but the brush cannot reach everywhere. Flossing helps rid food and bacteria between teeth. Hold the floss tight. Gently bring it down between the teeth. Do not pop the floss against the gum. Curve the floss around the tooth and rub up and down. Adjust the floss, so you use a fresh section for each tooth, including the back side of the last tooth, left and right, upper and lower.

Other Self-care

The dentist may recommend additional self-care treatments, such as massaging the gums with a rubber tip. Rinses to fight bacteria and plaque build-up may help some patients.

Dental Care

Dental health professionals check for gingivitis and remove plaque that has built up on teeth. A visit every six months is usually considered adequate. Patients with gingivitis may need more frequent cleanings. If the disease progresses and plaque builds up below the gum line, the area must be scraped off and smoothed with dental tools. Otherwise, accumulated plaque and tartar buildup make it easier for bacteria to grow.

If an area has progressed to periodontal disease, surgery or medication may be required. Treating an underlying medical problem may improve the health of your gums.

In patients with recurring or persistent gingivitis, the dentist will evaluate whether some other condition may be contributing to the gum disease.

If you are diagnosed with gingivitis, follow your dentist's instructions .

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Copyright © 2019 EBSCO Publishing All rights reserved.

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