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Q: 

a patient suffering from bilateral spondylolysis at L5 with grade 1 anteriolisthesis.Is this condition progressive?what is the best treatment for his chronic backach?Is surgery needed?

By Anonymous March 28, 2010 - 7:00am
 
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My friend had a history of trauma 2 yrs back.Intially she was t/t by bed rest,NSAIDs & braces for about 4-6 month.condition slightly improved.Later go for ct & mri & diagnosed as a case of "B/L spondylolysis at L5 with grade 1 anterolisthesis of L5 over S1".at present she has chronic back-ach & lower limb pain,which sometimes become very severe in intensity.she has already restricte her physical activites.please advice what is best T/T for him?Is SURGERY needed?Is this condition progressive?Is complete relief is possible?

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EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

This has all be very helpful. My daughter is 16 and was a pole vaulter - but started experiencing extreme pain after a bad drill two years ago but proceeded to vault until the pain got so bad she could no longer run. We saw a sports med dr 6 months ago and was immediately put in a back brace due to the stress fractures in her L5 --- well after months of no activity --and PT we just had a CT scan since she was still experiencing pain : The findings were not good and no progress over all this time :
bilateral L5 spondylolytic pars defects. There is very subtle
grade 1 anterior spondylolisthesis, measuring just a few millimeters on x-ray
and CT. There is a gap of about 3 mm in the pars defects themselves. These
fractures are not healed and at this point they are not expected to heal. Note
that the degree of spondylolisthesis can progress over time.

We are meeting with the dr in two weeks but at this point we are wanting to do what we can now while she is young to help her avoid issues she might encounter as she ages. I realize her level of grade is low (and trust me she has put down those pole vaulting poles for good - which is sad for a kid that was on mark to get to vault at D2 and possibly D1 colleges) but do we do surgery? From what I am reading and researching that is the only perminent fix

February 2, 2017 - 10:04am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Anonymous)

My daughter is also 16 years old and is a pole vaulter as well as a top level soccer player. She has had chronic lower back pain for about 10 months. It got to the point she could no longer play soccer and could vault with a lot of pain. We went to a Orthopedic Spine Specialist and she has the exact diagnosis as your daughter: bilateral pars defects/fractures in L5 with 3 mm gap and grade 1 spondylolisthesis. She is in a BOB brace for 3 months, first 8 weeks no activity, if pain subsides then 8 weeks of PT. If after 3 months pain is gone can proceed working back into sports. If after 6 months no improvement/pain then surgery is suggested. The PARS fractures will not heal without surgery. Much like you daughter my daughter was been recruited for soccer and was on her way to being a D1 recruit for pole vault too. She has hopes of continuing soccer in college but not sure if this will be possible without surgery. She said she would want the surgery if it comes to that. In the meantime, she is struggling with the inactivity, cloudiness of the future, possible change in her lifes plans, etc... I told her I never want her to touch a pole vault pole again as we think this is what put her back issue over the edge into spondolythesis.

March 29, 2018 - 12:07pm
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Hello madam is there anybody u know who had recovered from the anterolisthesis grade1 without surgery and played again

December 7, 2016 - 11:10pm
Guide (reply to Anonymous)

Hello Anonymous,

No, I do not know of any one.

Regards,
Maryann

December 8, 2016 - 9:58am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Maryann Gromisch RN)

Is it possible to play again without surgery

December 10, 2016 - 6:44am
Guide (reply to Anonymous)

Hello Anonymous,

That is a question to ask an orthopedic surgeon.

Regards,
Maryann

December 12, 2016 - 9:56am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Can a chiropractor deal with this problem

November 16, 2016 - 8:05am
Guide (reply to Anonymous)

Hello Anonymous,

Some people prefer going to a chiropractor.

Spondylosis refers to degenerative changes in the spine such as bone spurs and degenerating intervertebral discs.

Many different specialties of physicians treat spondylosis, including internists, family medicine doctors, general practitioners, rheumatologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedists, and pain-management specialists.

Non-physician health-care practitioners who often treat spondylosis include physician assistants and nurse practitioners, as well as physical therapists, massage therapists, and chiropractors.

Regards,
Maryann

November 16, 2016 - 9:14am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous (reply to Maryann Gromisch RN)

hi
i mean wheather a chiropractor can heal the bilateral spondylolysis completely
and is it 100% recoverable
can we make a return to cricket

November 21, 2016 - 1:20am
Guide (reply to Anonymous)

Hello Anonymous,

It is a degenerative disease, so I do not think it can be cured but rather symptoms can be managed. As far as being able to play cricket again, that is something to discuss with your healthcare professional.

Regards,
Maryann

November 21, 2016 - 11:02am
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