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Wellbutrin, adderall and thyroid

By May 31, 2017 - 8:49pm
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Can these drugs cause hyperthyroidism or parathyroidism? I have lost 20 lbs. in the last 9 months without really trying. Now I am crying a lot, have anxiety, negativism, insomnia etc.

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Hello January,

Welcome to the EmpowHER community. Thank you for reaching out to us with your question.

Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which your thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine. Hyperthyroidism can accelerate your body's metabolism significantly, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, sweating, and nervousness or irritability.

Hyperparathyroidism is an excess of parathyroid hormone in the bloodstream due to overactivity of one or more of the body's four parathyroid glands. These glands are about the size of a grain of rice and are located in your neck.

The parathyroid glands produce parathyroid hormone, which helps maintain an appropriate balance of calcium in the bloodstream and in tissues that depend on calcium for proper functioning.

Wellbutrin (bupropion) is an antidepressant medication used to treat major depressive disorder and seasonal affective disorder.

Adderall contains a combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are central nervous system stimulants that affect chemicals in the brain and nerves that contribute to hyperactivity and impulse control.

Adderall is used to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

No, these drugs do not cause hyperthyroidism or hyperparathyroidism.

Please speak with your physician about how you are feeling.


June 1, 2017 - 8:12am
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