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The Close Link Between Anger and Depression

By HERWriter
 
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When thinking about the circumstances, the frustrations might not go away and the person isn’t getting what they want, so then there is anger. However, it depends on the individual.

“The things we have to say to ourselves to make ourselves angry is different from the things we have to say to make ourselves depressed,” Hauck said.

Carol Landau, a clinical professor of psychiatry and medicine at Brown University School of Medicine in Rhode Island, said there are differences between different severities of depression and anger. She discussed the connection between anger and less severe forms of depression.

She said if people were not allowed to express their emotions, like anger, due to a neglectful, violent or absent family as children, then that sets them up for depression and other problems later on.

Anger is not necessarily a bad or good emotion — it’s natural — but how you express it is the issue. Women who are prone to depression tend to brood over a problem instead of telling people why they are angry. These women also tend to express their anger indirectly.

One way to deal with anger and depression is to go through dialectical behavior therapy, which focuses on a woman tuning into how she feels and thinking about actions and emotions more.

Never underestimate the value of friendship.

“If a woman has a confidante to help her, it really can buffer depression,” Landau said, because then the woman can talk over some of her emotional issues.

More ways to deal with anger include taking time before responding, admitting that you’re angry, don’t allow the instigator of the anger to gain control by you acting out, and if needed put off a discussion until a time when your anger is less.

Also, it is important to learn how to relax physically and psychologically when managing your anger.

Although women are thought to get angry less than men, this is not true, though it is still more acceptable for men to express anger than women, she said.

“I think it fits more with social role behavior,” Landau said.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.