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Sacroiliac Joint Pain: An Overview

 
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The traumatic SIJ injuries are caused by sudden impact which ‘jolts’ the joint, such as if you are thrown from a horse and land square on your buttocks. An injury of this nature can cause damage to the ligaments supporting the joint.

Biomechanical

If the pain is due to biomedical causes, the injuries can take some time to manifest. They may show up during a period of increased activity or a change in sport or occupation. The most common biomedical causes include:
overpronation

leg length discrepancy
twisted pelvis
and muscle imbalances

Hormonal

Hormonal changes can also cause sacroiliac pain. Especially during pregnancy, hormonal changes which occur for the purpose of preparing the body to deliver a baby, the ligaments of the pelvis will increase in laxity. If this is combined with weight gain, the pressure put on the spine can lead to painful mechanical changes in this area.

Inflammatory Joint Disease

The most spine affecting inflammatory conditions are Spondyloarthropathis. These include Ankylosing Spondvlities which is the leading inflammatory condition to cause SI joint pain.

Sources:

1)Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction. (SI Joint Pain) MedicineNet.com. Retrieved from the internet on December 19, 2011. http://www.medicinenet.com/sacroiliac_joint_pain/article.htm

2)“Sacroiliac Joint Pain”with advice from John Williams registered Osteopath and Sports Injury Therapist. Sports Injury Clinic. Retrieved from the internet on December 19, 2011.
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/cybertherapist/back/buttocks/sacroilia...

Reviewed December 19, 2011
by Michele Blacksberg RN
Edited by Jody Smith

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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