Hide This

FREEHER HealthToolkit

HER Health Toolkit

Sign up for EmpowHER updates and you'll receive our
FREE HER Health Toolkit

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Get Email Updates

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Homeschooling: Can They Go Together?

By Jody Smith HERWriter
 
Rate This
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Homeschooling: Can They Go Together? 0 5
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome related image
Photo: Getty Images

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and homeschooling. There's a combination that's only for the stout of heart. Or perhaps for those with a masochistic streak.

Homeschooling isn't for everyone. That's especially true for the CFS community who must avoid stressors and stimulation wherever possible.

But some of us were committed to home education before we got sick. Others actually find it less stressful than having the kids in school. They don't miss the chauffeuring, special projects,, or worrying about problems at school.

Different governments and schoolboards have different schooling requirements. Some are strict. Some are flexible.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome can manifest in a wide variety of forms. Your symptoms may be different from mine.

You may have a higher or lower energy level. Somebody drowning in a crash has different needs than someone who's gradually improving.

But some things are basic.

So for the CFS homeschoolers out there, let's try to keep your flimsy string of energy from snapping and your CFS brain power from winking out.

Government and schoolboard requirements must be met. Beyond that though, be gentle with yourself.

Use DVDs and CDs and public broadcasting. Use every labor-saving device you have access to. Streamline your lives.

Small children don't need alot of academics. Older children can do alot on their own. And some older children are really good at helping their younger siblings. In fact some older kids love it.

Take advantage of this. Build closer relationships amongst your children at the same time as you're taking care of yourself.

If you must schedule a set number of hours a day for schoolwork, build in rest periods. After you've done arithmetic, take a ten minute break.

Have a child read on their own, or color a picture, or ask your older child to read a story to your younger one. Meanwhile, go lay down for ten.

Come back for another half hour or so. Then have another rest.

And if you're in a major crash do the smart thing. Proclaim a school holiday while Mom (or Dad) are in the process of piecing themselves back together.

It's a marathon, folks.

Add a CommentComments

There are no comments yet. Be the first one and get the conversation started!

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Improved

1626 Health

Changed

603 Lives

Saved

453 Lives
3 lives impacted in the last 24 hrs Learn More

Take Our Featured Health Poll

Do your teens have their own cellphones?:
View Results