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3 Ways You Can Reduce The Risk For Cervical Cancer

By Expert HERWriter
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3 Ways You Can Reduce  Cervical Cancer Risk Ekaterina Pokrovsky/Fotolia

Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. But this number has fallen dramatically, thanks to advances in testing and a strong message from the medical field for women to have Pap tests regularly.

In fact, the most recent numbers show that just over 4,000 died from cervical cancer in 2012, whereas just over 41,000 women died from breast cancer. Now most women have insurance that will cover a test and many states offer free or low-cost programs for women without coverage, or who have very high deductibles.

Even so, cervical cancer is still a cancer causing a lot of devastation.

Here are three ways to reduce the risk for cervical cancer:

1) Have a Pap test and an HPV test as recommended by your health care provider.

According to many leading agencies, including the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecologists, women should begin testing at 21 years of age. They should continue to test every three years until they are 30 years old, assuming HPV test results are negative and Pap test results are normal.

From 30 to 65 years old, a woman has the option of continuing to have a Pap test only every three years. Or she can have a Pap and an HPV co-test every five years, assuming all results are normal/negative.

While most of the strains do not cause any problems, there are about 15 of the strains that can lead to cervical cancer. Preventive screening is critical to reducing cervical cancer risk as it can identify abnormal cells before they become fully cancerous and can identify whether or not a woman has the HPV virus in the cervical area.

2) Limit contact or use protection during sexual activities.

HPV is spread via skin-to-skin contact. so contact should be limited, or protection should be used, during sexual activities. Unlike other diseases that are spread via blood or secretions, HPV can transfer from one person to another simply by touching infected tissue such as during vaginal, anal and oral sex.

The CDC reports, “Anyone can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person.”

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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