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HPV

By March 8, 2011 - 9:49pm
 
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HI MY NAME IS REBECCA,LAST NOVEMBER OF 09 I HAD A BABY,DURING THE PROCESS I FOUND OUT I WAS HPV POSITIVE,WELL I WENT FOR A PAP TO SEE WHAT STAGE IT WAS AT,WELL MY OBGYN SAID IT WASNT EVEN BAD,SO FOR ME TO COME IN 6 MONTHS TO GET ANOTHER PAP AND I WOULD GET RESULTS WITHIN 48 HOURS,SO I CALLED THE NUMBER,PUT MY INFORMATION IN,AND MY PAP TEST CAME BACK NORMAL,SO IM GUESSING IT WENT AWAY ON ITS OWN,SO MY QUESTION IS,CAN I PASS THIS ON STILL? OR SINCE ITS GONE AND MY TEST CAME BACK NORMAL,THERE IS NO WAY TO PASS ANYTHING?

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Hi Rebecca,

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus. It has been estimated that 75% or more of sexually active Americans will contract HPV sometime in their lives. This means that anyone who has ever had sexual relations has a high chance of being exposed to this virus, but only a small number of women infected with HPV develop cell changes that need to be treated. In almost all cases, the immune system will keep the virus under control or get rid of it completely. Only very rarely does the presence of HPV lead to cervical cancer. You can have normal sexual activities with your partner, as there is nothing to pass on.

Check out similar questions to yours, here: http://www.empowher.com/community/ask/can-hpv-go-away-its-own

Best Wishes!

March 9, 2011 - 5:46am
(reply to Rosa Cabrera RN)

i meant like its someone other than who passed it to me,cause im currently not with this person anymore,i just wanna know can a new partner get it?

March 9, 2011 - 5:25pm
(reply to rebecca1027)

If you have had a negative HPV test, it is unlikely that you will spread that particular strain of HPV to a new partner. However, please know that it is important to use condoms with each new partner, as different strains of HPV may be spread from one partner to another (as well as other STDs). If you have been diagnosed with one STD, your chances of acquiring another STD increases.

In most cases, HPV is harmless and symptomless. The body clears most HPV infections naturally.

Here is some great information from the American Social Health Association (ASHA):
"What about partners?
Most sexually active couples share HPV until the immune response suppresses the infection (your body has suppressed the infection, hence your negative test result). Partners who are sexually intimate only with each other are not likely to pass the same virus back and forth. When HPV infection goes away the immune system will remember that HPV type and keep a new infection of the same HPV type from occurring again. However, because there are many different types of HPV, becoming immune to one HPV type may not protect you from getting HPV again if exposed to another HPV type."

"...it is reasonable to say the chances of transmitting virus years after the last clinical episode (where lesions were detected) will become increasingly remote over time. This is not easy to prove and the lack of a solid “yes or no” answer is frustrating. Still, HPV does not seem likely to always be active."

Source: Source: ASHA STD

March 10, 2011 - 12:26pm
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