Facebook Pixel

Acquired cystic kidney disease

June 10, 2008 - 7:30am
 
Rate This

Acquired cystic kidney disease

Back to Kidney Disease Center

What is ACKD?



ACKD develops in kidneys with long-term damage and bad scarring, so it often is associated with dialysis and end-stage renal disease. About 90 percent of people on dialysis for 5 years develop ACKD. People with ACKD can have any underlying kidney disease, such as glomerulonephritis or kidney disease of diabetes.

The cysts of ACKD may bleed. Kidney tumors, including kidney (renal) cancer, can develop in people with ACKD. Renal cancer is rare yet occurs at least twice as often in ACKD patients as in the general population.

How is ACKD diagnosed?



Patients with ACKD usually seek help because they notice blood in their urine (hematuria). The cysts bleed into the urinary system, which discolors urine. Diagnosis is confirmed using ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI of the kidneys.

How is ACKD treated?



Most ACKD patients are already receiving treatment for kidney problems. In rare cases, surgery is used to stop bleeding of cysts and to remove tumors or suspected tumors.

Source: 

Acquired cystic kidney disease. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health website. Available at: http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/polycystic/ . Accessed November 4, 2005.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Kidney Disease

Get Email Updates

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!