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Feminine Hygiene and Your Body

By MC Kelby HERWriter
 
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Over the last 50 years feminine hygiene has changed dramatically. Back in the day, we wore a contraption that was called a sanitary belt. This intimidating looking item with its straps would give anyone a panic attack.

Today, the market offers products with wings as well as a cup. The world of feminine hygiene has evolved and woman have more choices to find a product which is right for their body. But, what is the right product for your body?

First, start out slow when purchasing a new product, and try a sample. Avoid buying in bulk in case the product doesn't work out or if you have an allergic reaction.

If you are experiencing your period for the first time, try a sanitary pad with wings. The wings protect your underwear from stains. But when you have your period wear dark colored underwear to hide any possible mishaps.

Change your pad every three to four hours even during a light flow. This can minimize mishaps and keep you feeling clean and fresh.

For those of you who are active, you may want to consider tampons. Like sanitary napkins, tampons come in different sizes. They range from heavy flow days to light flow days.

The key thing to using tampons is to change them frequently to avoid toxic shock syndrome (TSS). If you keep a tampon in too long it can develop bacteria which can cause TSS.  Toxic shock syndrome can be a life threatening infection.

To dispose of a sanitary napkin, fold it in half, wrap with toilet paper, and put it in the garbage.  They, like tampons, should not be flushed down the toilet.  

At night, it may be best to use a sanitary napkin to avoid the possibility of TSS.

A tampon should also be changed every 4-6 hours or when it is saturated. Tampons can leak so it is important to not just forget about it, and to monitor its saturation level.

To remove a tampon, pull the string, wrap in toilet paper and throw away in the rubbish bin.  
 
If the string accidentally breaks on a tampon don't panic. While tampons are very sturdy, there is a very slim possibility of the string breaking. The most important thing is to relax and bear down.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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