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What Is The Difference Between A Small Bladder And An Overactive Bladder? - Dr. Eilber (VIDEO)

By Dr. Karyn Eilber Expert
 
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More Videos from Dr. Karyn Eilber 20 videos in this series

What Is The Difference Between A Small Bladder And An Overactive Bladder? - Dr. Eilber (VIDEO)
What Is The Difference Between A Small Bladder And An Overactive Bladder? - ...
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Dr. Eilber explains the difference between having a small bladder and having an overactive bladder.

Dr. Eilber:
No one has a small bladder; even if someone surgically has part of their bladder removed it will typically expand over time. You can have a functionally small bladder, meaning that you can’t hold a lot of urine, but anatomically if I were to put you under anesthesia, you probably would have the same capacity as, say, a normal person.

So people who say they have small bladders, functionally they cannot hold a lot because their bladder is just too sensitive. Normally a patient’s bladder will fill; they will feel an urge to go, but they can usually ignore it and it will go away once the bladder stretches past a certain point. People with overactive bladder either develop such strong urgency feelings that they have to empty their bladder or they actually will have incontinence.

About Dr. Karyn Eilber, M.D.:
Dr. Karyn Eilber, M.D., is one of the few board certified female urologists in the Los Angeles area that is fellowship trained in the treatment of incontinence, voiding dysfunction, and female pelvic reconstruction. Dr. Eilber received her medical degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine and completed a urology residency and fellowship also at UCLA.

Following fellowship training, Dr. Eilber joined the Department of Urology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center where she gained extensive experience in pelvic reconstruction following cancer treatment and treating male incontinence after prostatectomy. Since returning to California, her practice is focused on vaginal reconstruction and the treatment of both men and women for incontinence and voiding dysfunction.

Visit Dr. Eilber at her Web site

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