Hide This

FREEHER HealthToolkit

HER Health Toolkit

Sign up for EmpowHER updates and you'll receive our
FREE HER Health Toolkit

Arthritis

Get Email Updates

Related Checklists

Arthritis Guide

Maryann Gromisch RN Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.

ASK

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!

Holistic Alternatives to Hip Replacement

By Joanna Karpasea-Jones
 
Rate This

If you’re not keen on medications for osteoarthritis, or they aren’t effective and you aren’t keen on surgery, you may wish to explore holistic alternatives.

In a survey conducted for Arthritis Today, the most recommended therapies for arthritis pain were glucosamine, capsaicin, acupuncture, tai chi, biofeedback, yoga, and mental health-enhancing modalities such as spirituality, journal writing and meditation.

Glucosamine: This is a supplement that is extracted from shell fish. There is a vegetarian version of glucosamine for those on restricted diets or those allergic to shell fish. Glucosamine is a naturally occurring substance in the body that is used for the formation, maintenance and repair of cartilage. A study published in the Lancet gave 212 osteoarthritis sufferers either 1,500mgs of glucosamine daily or a placebo over three years. They found that the patients taking glucosamine had no significant joint space loss – their joints had not gotten worse over the three years, whereas the patients taking the placebo had progressively worsening joints.

"The 106 patients on placebo had a progressive joint-space narrowing, with a mean joint-space loss after 3 years. There was no significant joint-space loss in the other 106 patients on glucosamine sulphate: Similar results were reported with minimum joint-space narrowing. Symptoms worsened slightly in patients on placebo compared with the improvement observed after treatment with glucosamine sulphate. The long-term combined structure-modifying and symptom-modifying effects of glucosamine sulphate suggest that it could be a disease modifying agent in osteoarthritis."

Capsaicin: This is an extract of chilli peppers. It is very hot and potent and is used as a treatment for arthritic pains. It is available in a topically applied cream and works by decreasing pain signals. When you first apply it, you may feel a burning sensation, but this should stop after first use. One of three clinical trials for osteoarthritis showed a significant benefit for osteoarthritis patients using capsaicin.

Add a Comment2 Comments

Joanna Karpasea-Jones

No, I haven't heard of that but I will look into it as I have been told my left hip has worn out so I am currently exploring all surgical and non-surgical options and I hope my articles on this will help other people in the same position.

July 29, 2011 - 5:49am
EmpowHER Guest
Anonymous

Are you familiar with the new natural supplement called "omniflex"? If so, what do you think of it?

July 27, 2011 - 9:05am
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

Improved

1896 Health

Changed

787 Lives

Saved

652 Lives
4 lives impacted in the last 24 hrs Learn More

Take Our Featured Health Poll

Do your teens have their own cellphones?:
View Results