Facebook Pixel

Health Tip: Thunderstorms Can Trigger Asthma Attacks in Children

Rate This
Asthma related image Photo: Getty Images

It may not surprise you that pollen, colds, or particles in the air can trigger childhood asthma attacks. But did you know thunderstorms also cause attacks?
A Lifescript.com article said a published 2008 Emory University study showed a 3 percent increase in asthma-related emergency room visits on days after thunderstorms. If you think about it, it makes sense that thunderstorms can churn up pollen and mold in the air, setting off an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to allergens.

It also was suggested that lightning could be leaving increased levels of nitrogen dioxide and ozone in the air, which also could irritate sensitive lungs. For this reason, it may be a good idea for someone with asthma to refrain from going outside in the day or two after a thunderstorm.

If you or your child exhibits symptoms of wheezing, coughing, tightness in the chest, or difficult breathing, it is important to seek immediate medical care, especially if he/she is known to have asthma.

Do you have a question about Parenting? Check out EmpowHER’s pages and the WomensHealth.gov website. Sign-up, post a question, share your story, connect with other women in our groups and community, and feel EmpowHERed!

Lifescript.com: Childhood Asthma10 Surprising Triggers
EmpowHER.com: Know Your Asthma Triggers to Keep Symptoms in Check

Christine Jeffries is a writer/editor for work and at heart, and lives in a home of testosterone with her husband and two sons. Christine is interested in women’s health and promoting strong women.

Add a Comment1 Comments

HERWriter Guide

Great article, Christine! I hadn't thought of this possibility before but of course, it can rake up a ton of irritants to the lungs. Before I read the body of your text, I was assuming it was a psychological issue.


May 13, 2011 - 11:11am
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.


Get Email Updates

Related Checklists

Asthma Guide

Have a question? We're here to help. Ask the Community.


Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!