Facebook Pixel
EmpowHER Guest
Q: 

Bladder Slings

By Anonymous December 19, 2011 - 7:18am
 
Rate This

Are bladder slings OK to get for incontinence? I understand a mesh material is used now and works better. What are the hazards to having one?

Add a Comment1 Comments

Hi Anon:

Before you choose urinary incontinence surgery, get an accurate diagnosis. Different types of incontinence require different surgical approaches. Your doctor may refer you to an incontinence specialist, urologist or urogynecologist for further diagnostic testing.

If you plan on having children, your doctor may recommend holding off on surgery until you're finished with childbearing. The strain of pregnancy and delivery on your bladder, urethra and supportive tissues may "undo" any prior surgical fix.

Surgery can only correct the problem it's designed to treat and, in some cases, won't cure your incontinence. If you have mixed incontinence, for instance, surgery for stress incontinence may not improve your urge incontinence. You may need medications and physical therapy after surgery to treat the urge incontinence. Incontinence is caused by weak or damaged nerves and muscles, and surgery can only compensate for the damage. It can't repair the damaged nerves and muscles.

Know the risks

Like any surgical procedure, stress urinary incontinence surgery comes with risks and potential complications. For instance, surgery itself may give rise to different urinary and genital problems, such as:

  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/img/icon_li_footer.gif); background-color: initial; min-width: 0px; padding-left: 13px; line-height: 1.5em; background-position: 0px 7px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Difficulty urinating and incomplete emptying of the bladder (urinary retention), although this is usually temporary
  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/img/icon_li_footer.gif); background-color: initial; min-width: 0px; padding-left: 13px; line-height: 1.5em; background-position: 0px 7px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Development of an overactive bladder, which could include urge incontinence
  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/img/icon_li_footer.gif); background-color: initial; min-width: 0px; padding-left: 13px; line-height: 1.5em; background-position: 0px 7px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Pelvic organ prolapse
  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/img/icon_li_footer.gif); background-color: initial; min-width: 0px; padding-left: 13px; line-height: 1.5em; background-position: 0px 7px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Urinary tract infection
  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/img/icon_li_footer.gif); background-color: initial; min-width: 0px; padding-left: 13px; line-height: 1.5em; background-position: 0px 7px; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Difficult or painful intercourse

Talk with your doctor to understand the risks and benefits of the different types of surgery.

Other treatments can be found here: http://www.empowher.com/condition/urinary-incontinence/treatments

Hope this helps,

Rosa

December 19, 2011 - 7:40am
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you agree to EmpowHER's terms of service and privacy policy
Add a Comment

All user-generated information on this site is the opinion of its author only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical conditions. Members and guests are responsible for their own posts and the potential consequences of those posts detailed in our Terms of Service.

Urinary Incontinence

Get Email Updates

Health Newsletter

Receive the latest and greatest in women's health and wellness from EmpowHER - for free!