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Real Talk About Flu with Dr. Susan Rehm, NFID's Medical Director

By Susan Cody HERWriter Guide
 
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Interview about flu with NFID's Medical Director Dr. Susan Rehm
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I was able to read the findings of Dr. Susan Rehm, Medical Director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) and Vice Chairman of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Cleveland Clinic recently and include them in an article entitled Mind Your Flu Manners: Avoid it for Yourself and Those Around You.

After the article was published on EmpowHER.com, I was lucky enough to be able to interview Dr. Susan Rehm via email, in order to get even more information from the expert herself.

The interview can be read below:

Q
Dr. Rehm, many people believe that the flu season is only during three months of winter. Can you tell how long the season generally is? When is the best time to get the flu vaccine?

A
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), the timing of flu is very unpredictable and can vary from season to season. In the United States, flu activity most commonly peaks in January or February. However, seasonal flu activity can begin as early as October and continue to occur as late as May.

The best time to get the flu vaccine is as soon as possible! It’s not too late to get the flu vaccine this season. The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease.

Q
The survey gave great insight into the mindset of people about the flu. But do you think people know the difference between influenza and a bad cold, since many symptoms match? Were the participants aware of the differences?

A
More than two out of three (69 percent) surveyed thought they knew the difference between cold and flu symptoms. However when provided with a list of symptoms, they only correctly identified half (5 out of 10) of symptoms associated with flu.

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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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