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Nutrition for Autoimmune Conditions

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The latest issue of Vitamin Research News offers several suggestions for nutritional supplements for patients with autoimmune conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus were the primary focus. There are many different autoimmune disorders that are treated with the same drugs (mostly corticosteroids). Nutrition researchers look for dietary factors that can benefit patients with immune dysfunction in general. DHEA, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids are the top recommendations in the current report.

When I checked the references, I found much favorable data on DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone). This adrenal hormone is the precursor for the production of a variety of other molecules in the body, including androgens, estrogens, and both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory hormones. Low concentrations of DHEA have been found in the blood in patients with Sjogren's syndrome, eczema and dermatitis skin rashes, and asthma. For lupus, a review article summarizing the results of seven randomized controlled trials reported DHEA has a “modest but clinically significant impact on health related quality of life”.

Since autoimmune disorders affect women more than men, it seems reasonable to study the effects of sex hormones on the immune system. A recent review article reports “significant immune modulatory function” for DHEA. The plant-derived version is available as a dietary supplement.

Vitamin D is well known for its potential protection from multiple sclerosis, which is more common in parts of the world that receive little sunlight. There is less data about the effects of this vitamin on other autoimmune conditions, but concerns about skin cancer may increase the risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Omega-3 fatty acids are widely recognized for health benefits. Dietary sources include fatty fish, flax seeds, and walnuts. You can buy fish oil capsules or other omega-3 capsules at any store that has a health food aisle.

For my own nutritional support, I eat ground flax seeds and take multivitamins. I don't take DHEA, but I will definitely keep it in mind if I develop an autoimmune condition.


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At age 50 I was diagnosed with RA. I was unable to climb stairs due to the swelling in my hips. Vitamin D helped reduce the pain. I also took glucosimine, probiotics, Omega 3 fish oil. I did improve. 3 years later, I added Essiac tea, I am off all antiimflamatories!!! I was told by 3 doctors that I would not be able to walk the 5 miles daily again as I did prior to getting sick. I have no pain and I am walking 5 miles six days a week.
Walking Miracle

June 25, 2010 - 8:20am
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We value and respect our HERWriters' experiences, but everyone is different. Many of our writers are speaking from personal experience, and what's worked for them may not work for you. Their articles are not a substitute for medical advice, although we hope you can gain knowledge from their insight.

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